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Phoenix Primary School ‘Where We Rise to the Challenge’

Science Policy

 Science Policy at Phoenix School...where science rocks.

SCIENCE POLICY –(used in conjunction with the Staff Science Handbook)

Vision Statement

In Phoenix, Science stimulates and excites pupil’s curiosity about natural phenomena and events in the world around them. Pupils understand how major scientific ideas contribute toward technological change – impacting on industry, medicine, business and improving quality of life. They learn to question and discuss science based issues that may affect their own lives, the directions of society and the future of the world, encouraging and supporting the development of Science capital. This knowledge base of Science has a practical application to everyday experiences and is therefore important for pupil’s social development. By working scientifically, through tailored investigations involving planning, testing, recording and analysing results, students come to appreciate the nature of the learning process. All teachers, design and plan activities providing opportunities for students to display and to develop and apply their creative and imaginative capacities in Science. These activities also enable them to experience an ongoing sense of success in their teaching and learning which are transferable to other subjects.

Aims:

The National Curriculum for Science aims to ensure that all pupils:

● Develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines.

 ● Develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them

● Are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future.

 As well as these, Phoenix Primary School aims to:

● Enable pupils to make decisions about the uses and values of scientific work and achievements

● Enable pupils to develop an understanding and respect for the natural world

● Enable pupils to question, hypothesise, test and discover for themselves about our world.

● Develop the skills required to investigate the world around them.

● To develop the children’s confidence and self-belief in using science from classroom to career in recognising possible scientific careers.

Leadership and Management Roles.

The subject leader has specially-allocated time for fulfilling the task of reviewing samples of children’s work, reviewing science floor books, training, liaising with other subject leaders from other schools and planning team teaching initiatives with NQT or RQTs. The Science co-ordinator is responsible for ensuring that the aims of the Science Policy are met.

In addition to this, the science co-ordinators should:

● Be enthusiastic about Science and demonstrate good practice, championing our “Can Do” culture and “Science Rocks” mantra.

● Encourage and support staff in the implementation of the curriculum and school approaches to Science teaching.

 ● Co-ordinate assessment procedures and record keeping to ensure progression and development throughout the school

● Monitor the teaching and learning of Science throughout the school

● Organise, review and purchase all science-based resources, ensuring they are readily available and maintained.

● Support staff by encouraging the sharing of ideas and organising in-service training as appropriate.

● To review and audit the Staff Science Handbook.

● To support NQTs and RQTs.

● To organise Phoenix Science Week and co-organise STEM or STEAM weeks.

Equal Opportunities and Inclusion.

At Phoenix Primary School we are committed to providing all children with an equal entitlement to scientific activities and opportunities regardless of race, gender, culture or class. This ensures that the science POS satisfies the NC requirements.

Inclusion.

In school we aim to meet the needs of all our children by differentiation in our science planning and in providing a variety of approaches and tasks appropriate to ability levels.

Classes 7 b and c are taught science together and follow the year 3 science POS. Class 7a follow the EYFS curriculum and use “The understanding of the world.” Element for their science POS.

Science in EYFS.

Play underpins the delivery of all the EYFS. In playing, children behave in different ways: sometimes within their play, they may describe and discuss what they are doing and sometimes they may be more reflective and quiet as they play. Within a secure and challenging environment with effective support, children can explore, develop and experiment as they play to help them make sense of the world. The EYFS strand ‘Understanding the World’ leads directly to scientific elements of the curriculum and leads to more formalised Science learning in KS1 and then KS2. They are assessed according to the Development Matters attainment targets and recorded in the FS floor book.

Science in KS1 and KS2.

Science is taught in two discrete lessons per week, a total of one and a half hours per week. Teachers plan their own lessons and investigations from long term plans provided by the science lead. Each year the Public Health England initiative called E-bug is taught in all year groups.  This  POS teaches children about hand and respiratory hygiene and antibiotic overuse.

The principal focus of science teaching in key stage 1 is to enable pupils to experience and observe phenomena, looking more closely at the natural and humanly-constructed world around them. They should be encouraged to be curious and ask questions about what they notice. They should be helped to develop their understanding of scientific ideas by using different types of scientific enquiry to answer their own questions, including observing changes over a period of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative tests, and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should begin to use simple scientific language to talk about what they have found out and communicate their ideas to a range of audiences in a variety of ways. Most of the learning about science should be done through the use of first-hand practical experiences, but there should also be some use of appropriate secondary sources, such as books, photographs and videos. ‘Working scientifically’ is described separately in the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to the teaching of substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content. Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary at a level consistent with their increasing word reading and spelling knowledge at key stage 1. These are recorded in science floor books. Every KS1 class uses a class SFB. Practical work and investigations are conducted in mixed ability groups.

 

The principal focus of science teaching in lower key stage 2 is to enable pupils to broaden their scientific view of the world around them. They should do this through exploring, talking about, testing and developing ideas about everyday phenomena and the relationships between living things and familiar environments, and by beginning to develop their ideas about functions, relationships and interactions. They should ask their own questions about what they observe and make some decisions about which types of scientific enquiry are likely to be the best ways of answering them, including observing changes over time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative and fair tests and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should draw simple conclusions and use some scientific language, first, to talk about and, later, to write about what they have found out. ‘Working scientifically’ is described separately at the beginning of the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content. Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary correctly and with confidence, using their growing word reading and spelling knowledge. Each KS2 class have 3-4 SFB which they record their science in. Practical work and investigations are conducted in mixed ability groups.

 Planning.

Science is taught in a cross curricular manner, where possible, and integrated into classes ongoing ‘topic’ work to provide more contextual and meaningful learning experiences. Throughout the year teachers will teach several stand-a lone lessons which fill the gap between science topics that the children study just once, don’t revisit after KS1 or in preparation for subject not taught until UKS2.

 Teachers plan for at least one main investigation per topic and as many minor investigations that is required. The subject leader has responsibility for the school’s long-term plans. Individual teachers plan weekly lesson. The science lead plans for lessons when covering PPA. This changes yearly depending on staffing needs. All science plans are available on the school shared drive.

Examples of cross-curricular.

English – opportunities to write for varied purposes, with the characteristics of different kinds of writing. For example, chronological reports, recounts, balance arguments and note taking. There is a emphasis on science vocabulary and cross curricular words are identified on the class working wall.

 ● Mathematics – (“science and maths are best buddies” is our chant!)-developing skills in data handling, measurements and mathematical relationships.

 ● Art – understanding of materials and their properties, designing and creating own inventions.

Geography – exploring physical processes. Use of biodome for science activities.

History – researching Scientist, their discoveries and the impact in today’s society

Computing – data handling and research.

PSHE – health and safety education.

P4C-The discussion of questions with a direct cross curricular link with science.

Global learning and Rights Respecting-Understanding of science in a global context through discussion and P4C sessions. Raising awareness of and researching science projects world wide and their impacts on the world stage.

Assessment.

Teachers will assess children’s Science work in a variety of ways to ensure they gain a full understanding of what each child has learnt, and what is needed to progress their understanding. Teachers will observe, provide written and oral feedback. Teachers will use the statements on classroom monitor assessment system to support them to make an overall judgement of children’s scientific ability. Progression in science is discussed in pupil progress meetings and relevant targets and actions are considered. In addition, teacher assessments are recorded half termly using the school’s assessment policy and reports to parents in an end of year written report.

Other assessment tools include:

  • M.O.S.S activity. Phoenix science lessons start with a MOSS-(mental and oral science starter) This is a short session, a game, a quiz, a vocabulary activity or mini investigation. This can be used to assess children’s prior learning and retention.
  • End of term review of learning-this is completed by staff at the end of the topic and high lights the strengths and future developments of the topic. It includes pupil voice.
  • “Science rocks at Phoenix.” Challenges. Seen in science floor books and used as a tool to assist quality marks.

 

Recording in Science.

The way in which Science is recorded will vary across the school depending on age and ability. Teachers should ensure that a range of appropriate methods are used. All classes have a science wall. Staff are directed to include specific items on the wall, including a vocabulary section and misconception board. These may include:

● Written accounts including: instructions, reports and explanations, booklets, leaflets and posters.  Recorded in class science floor books.

● Diagrams, drawings and pictures and paintings

● Annotated diagrams

● Spreadsheets (data collection)

● Charts, graphs and tables

 ● Model making

 ●Photographs and videos.

 ●Role play, hot seating and class presentations.

 ● Title pages as introduction of each topic and pupil voice on covers of science floor books

 ● Pupil voice on science displays and pupil questionnaires.

Safe Practice.

Children are encouraged to consider their own safety and the safety of others at all times. Teachers will provide a safe and secure environment for children to learn. Any experiments or trips which are considered a particular risk will need a Risk Assessment Form to be completed and to consult the Science Co-ordinator, trips lead and any relevant SLT members prior. Consultation with the site manager is also advised before any practical investigations are under taken. School is supported by CLEAPSS through our membership provided by the local authority. Resources are stored appropriately and depending on the item require a secured, locked place. Staff are required to send parent permission letters when considering investigations that may need parental consent or additional information.

Achievement in Science.

 Achievement in science is celebrated by:

● Displaying work.

● Communicating findings in class to others.

● Presenting of achievement certificates in achievement assembly and termly presentation of “The scientist of the term.”

 ● Science dojos awarded by class teacher and science lead.

● STEM and STEAM Festivals.

● Celebrating Phoenix Science Week.

●Celebrating good work, research at home or sharing resources by posting on Twitter @phoenix_science and on the school website.

 

Parents (Including Homework)

 Parental input is highly valued and parents are regularly invited and welcomed into school to share their own expertise with the children. There are regular parent and family science workshops and during science week Phoenix runs parents and kids’ science sessions. Parents of PP children are invited via a written invitation to these events. Children may receive science homework based on their current topic or vocabulary based homework.

Parents and SRE

Phoenix Primary school understands the position of parents and their right to withdraw their children from elements of the sex education of the SRE curriculum. Children cannot be withdrawn from the science national curriculum and are therefore included in all topics in all years. 

Sue Evans attends the year 6 sex education session if required.

 

 

On-line and home learning.

  •  A mixture of a science pack and recorded material/videos will be used for home learning.

 

  • Science pack: topic based-(see current Science LTPs) This will consist of photocopied activities to enable access for children who don’t have printers at home. Additional resources, (eg: glue or pencils from their class pack)

 

  • Videos- story telling. Books with a science theme and an age related activity. For eg: listen to the story and identify 5 science words. Discuss with your parent/ whoever you live with what they mean. 
  • Videos- a practical task. For example: describe what you see when you look out of your window, find 5 objects in your house that are made from plastic. 

 

  • Staff will put these activities on tapestry and parent dojo platform.

 

 

  • Parents/carers will be encouraged to follow @phoenix_science and post any questions/ childrens’ work they have. 

 

  • Feedback for children will be provided if work is returned to school.

 

 

Mrs Sue Evans- Phoenix Primary School-science lead teacher.

October 2020.

Date of staff consultation: October 2020.

Review Date: October 2021.

 

 

 

 v

Staff Science Handbook.

                  

s.evans@phoenixprimaryschool.co.uk

Twitter: @phoenix_science

My room: Opposite the interventions room on the first floor.

In school: Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday-(all day)

Resources and materials.

You will find the science resources located in cupboards in the year 1 and 2 corridor. They are arranged in NC topics with the addition of a “general resources” and “kitchen science” equipment cupboards. I have a good range of science books and resources such as games available in my room.

 If there is anything you need that is not present please let me know.

 To help with re-ordering and replacement of broken materials please let me know if we are running low on specific resources.

If you have any questions or queries on resources please ask. Don’t put off doing an investigation because you can’t access the correct resources.

 

 

Other resources.

  • Staff shared drive.    
  • School website.
  • Twitter
  • Biodome
  • Filing cabinets in SE’s room-ideas for investigations, games and activities.
  • STEM-need to join to access materials but this is free.
  • Newspaper articles.
  • Food labels-especially for MOSS activities.
  • Twinkl-use sparingly.
  • Hamilton science-Can access without having purchased the scheme.
  • BBC Bitesize.
  • You Tube-beware of Americanisms and name changes.
  • Science display boards-(not the science wall in your classroom) These are found outside the hall. Please make children aware of these as they pass!

 

Classroom science wall.

All classes need a science wall in their classroom. Please remember that science is a core subject and the science wall is a non-negotiable and needs to be used to aid children’s understanding and learning. To assist with continuity there are items that have to be present.

If there are any items that you don’t have in your classroom, please ask.

Science classroom wall contents.

1.Title- to comply with the school “Science Rocks” theme there needs to be a science rocks title banner.

2. Working scientifically cards/posters.

3. Science misconception board- (“board” meaning A4 laminated piece of paper).

4. Learning objectives board.

5. M.O.S.S board.

6. Topic relevant vocab cards.

7. Information about graphs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Science wall information: What to look out for.

 

Other notes.

If a child uses a word that isn’t on the wall, encourage them to write it on a vocab card and add it to the list.

Children need to be familiar with the science wall as you…so don’t be afraid to use it with the children.

Encourage the children to use the science wall as you would for the English and maths wall.

Science zone banner helps to focus children on the science wall.

These are working scientifically question prompts. Please refer to these throughout sessions.

Can be the learning objective for the session or a child to write a sentence about what you are learning.

The MISCONCEPTION BOARD-very important. If a cd says something that is incorrect or a misconception, encourage them to write it on a post-it and stick it on the misconception wall. Important to stress that they are not stupid or silly, it there because we need to know what to teach.

Information to assist children in the completion of graphs.

Vocab cards. These are a non-negotiable.  Cd produce them and use in science lessons and any cross curric work.

Clearly labelled as the science wall.

The science wall should be in a designated place in the classroom which is accessible to the children and clearly seen.

 

 

Science floor books.

Science Floor Books.

Phoenix changed to the system of floor books three years ago. It is an on-going process and is subject to review and change.

FS- Science is represented in the reception children’s floor book. This includes pupil voice, mark making and writing, activities and photographs.

        What needs to be included in the science floor books?

It is very important that all these things are included. There will be several moderation sessions for all age groups this year from the authority and you will need to be able to show all children’s work.

  • Front of books need to have a cover identifying what it is, year group and for KS2, names of the children in the group. Pupil voice should also be included on the front cover. An example is below:

…at Phoenix!

2019-20.

Year 3 science floor book.

In this group there is…                                  

 

 

 

*Title page for the topic being taught, including date.

  • Learning objective from the national curriculum. There also needs to be a working scientifically objective.
  • Children’s work needs to be named and shown if it was teacher supported, LSA supported, peer supported or independent.
  • All children should have work in the book-for example if you are drawing a graph or making an observational drawing every child needs one. To save space these can be collated in a book format and attached to a single page.
  • Marking-evidence needs to be seen of in class marking, peer marking, QM –(Quality Mark)- teacher marking. These need to be done for everychild at least once a week. They are most effective when completed during the session. Please indicate an QM on the page in the SFB.
  • Pupil voice-for example, if a child asks a question or addresses a misconception it needs to be recorded in the SFB.
  • Photographs where appropriate, annotated with pupil voice.
  • See-saw.
  • Evidence of practical sessions. For example, dissecting a flower, looking at materials etc can be placed in the SFB- (placing sticky backed plastic over it helps to secure it).

 

 

  • The “fill the gap” stand-alone lesson. These are in the LTPs.
  • At the end of the topic teachers need to complete a “Learning feedback document” which consists of identifying strengths and developments - (or next steps) and a review of the learning. This is a great way of including some pupil voice.
  • The “Learning feedback document” is available on the shared drive or from Sue E. An example is shown below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…at Phoenix.

Learning feedback document

Date  March 2019.         Activity  Review of plant topic.

 

 

 

Developments.

  • The pollination system needs to be covered again-ran out of time. Look at doing it as a stand alone sesson next half term.
  • Needed to get more data handling into the session-but I was doing a review of the links between maths and data handling at the time-since spoken to the maths lead and HT. Tables were used but lacked bar charts, pictograms etc.
  • Develop the use of Vocab grids to walk a long side the homemade cd’s vocab cards
  • Ensure cd get more opportunities to identify common plants and trees-this often isn’t embedded in KS1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Strengths.

  • Good general science knowledge from cd. Used knowledge they had learnt in yrs 1 and 2, esp the names an functions of the parts of plant.
  • Good understanding from most of the cd about what is required to ensure a plant/bulb/ seed to grow and survive.
  • Opportunity to use bio dome to show growth and stages of growth.
  • Maj of cd enjoyed and benefitted from the stand- alone lesson on Earth and space-esp allowing the cd who find writing a barrier to their science

Learning a chance to explore vocabulary.

  • Managed 2 investigations, well. Cd participated and enjoyed working in mixed ability groups.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review of learning.

*Quality Marks-continue to be an issue due to the two week science time table, if a child is away then it could be a month before this is completed.

* Year 3 have a good sound knowledge of plants, but still need to look at pollination as this wasn’t covered due to time.

* Two week time table is still a problem. The main issue being retention.

*HAPs children are performing especially well with an improvement in science spelling, for example see 7.1.19 activity. MAPs and LAPs still need reminders to use vocab wall.

* Investigate relocation of science wall in year 3 as it’s present position can hinder cd’s access.

* Giving the topic of plants more than half a term has had a positive impact-for example more frequent opportunities to observe spring flowers and environments in the biodome.

* Investigate looking at seasonal changes with specific reference to flowers and plants to help with the confusion of spring flowers appearing in January. (possible links with GL here).

* Due to the poor knowledge of plant names-(see in most of the classes)-I have made some simple identification games, which can be used for a starter or a filler if needed.

* Practical activities continue to enhance learning, for example making a physical representation of a plant using our bodies- see 4.2.19

 

Working scientifically.

Working scientifically is a major part of the National Curriculum. It should be taught across the curriculum and not as a separate subject. Your planning and LOs should show not only your LO but your working scientifically LO. This when displayed in the floor book may look like this:

 

Monday 5.9.21.                                           Year 1.

LO: “Identify and name a variety of common wild and garden plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees.” (NC) “Observe closely, using simple equipment” (WS)

These can be typed out or hand written by the children.

Recording WS may be done by pupil voice, recording, photographs, showing graphs, charts or tables.

 

 

You will receive some of these to use in class when discussing a cross curricular word. Display these on the class science wall.

Children should be encouraged to identified cross curricular words, for example on the English walling wall. If children identify these words they should be rewarded by using the class reward system of science dojos.

 

Cross curricular stickers.

 

 

Cross-curricular science word.

 

  

 

 

 

To ensure that children are challenged in their science, staff need to set challenges for the more able children. In a SFB this may not be as obvious as it is in a child’s exercise book. When you have set challenges for high ability children use this sticker in the SFB to identify this activity. These can also be used in cross-curricular science activities.

Science challenge sticker.

 

  

 

Science rocks at Phoenix.

The science challenge.

 

 

Reward and praise stickers.

Staff are to follow the rewards system that can be found in the marking policy. In addition, stickers can be used to reward science work in class and in the SFB. SE has a stock of science stickers if staff require them.       

SEs reward stickers.

 

You have been awarded 5 dojos for excellent science work.

You are a super scientist.

From: Mrs Evans.

Give this ticket to your teacher.

 

 

 

These tickets are given out by SE for children who have worked well in science lessons, done something at home and presents it at school or used science vocabulary in class. Please encourage children to “find me” and celebrate their science work through these tickets. They should be then placed in the SFB.

 

       
   
     
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Science phrases and chants.

At Phoenix we want our children to believe that they are scientists… a “CAN DO” attitude. As a result, we have several phrases that we use to help with science teaching. Children should be rewarded for using these by being given science dojos.

“Maths and science are best buddies”-used to develop the children’s understanding that these two subjects are closely related.

  • “It’s cross curricular!” Making a shape of a cross with their hands the children say this when a cross curricular issue occurs in class. For example describing materials, a poem about plants, discussing habitats in geography. Children should be rewarded with science dojos.
  • “It’s not magic, it’s science.”- Young children particularly are sometimes in awe of investigations or mini experiments and meet this with a statement that its magic. To create the correct attitude towards science we use this phrase to address this mis-conception.
  • Science power words- in the first lesson of a new topic vocabulary cards are produced by the children and placed on the science wall in class. During this activity and throughout science and other lesson please refer to science vocab as “science power words” “These are called science power words because they make us powerful scientists.”

 

Scientist of the term.

At the end of every term staff will be asked to nominate a child to receive the award “Scientist of the Term.” This award goes to a child who has shown great progress in science, maintains an enthusiasm for the subject, helped to develop the subject in school, undertaken research at home. The child is presented with a certificate and small science themed gift during an assembly and parents/friends of the child are invited.

 

MTP and LTP

Science medium term planning should be completed on the schools MTP pro-forma and placed on the shared drive. If SE teachers your science please write “See SEs planning” LTP for science are available from the curriculum overviews and SE produces a LTP which indicates what topic is taught for each half term. Please see SE or the curriculum lead if you have any questions.

 

What does a Phoenix science lesson look like?

“I love science ‘cos we do loads of experiments.” (Former C7 pupil.)

 

Start of a new topic first session.

The first lesson of a new topic is different from the rest of the lessons and always take the same structure and format.

  1. Brief chat on what your new topic is, how long you will be doing the topic for and what are they going to learn?
  2. Discussion in groups-(at this stage it can be mixed ability to encourage children to share everything they might already know about the new topic.) * COVID 19 RESTRICTIONS MAY MEAN THAT CHILDREN CANNOT MOVE ARRANGE THE CLASSROOM. PLEASE REFER TO LATEST SCHOOL ADVICE.

 

  1. Children to write down on post-its what they already know about the new topic. Please ensure that the date and children’s name is on their post-it.

 

  1.  

What we already know about plants.

 

What we want to learn about plants.

Please ensure that this is in the FSB. It is very important at this stage to tell the children that we are not judging them, they are free to say what they want and any “misconceptions” will be written on the mis-conception science wall and looked at throughout the topic to see if we have found out whether it is indeed a misconception and how we know it is. An example might be: “The stem of a plant is solid.” The child would write this on a post-it with their name and date on it and place it on the misconception board.

  1. The children then are introduced to the vocabulary of the topic. Present the children with a word list from the topic-(some vocab lists are available in the science folder on the share drive.) These are to be written in pencil first on a strip of paper and checked by adults to ensure correct spelling. The children are invited to illustrate the word to aid understanding, retention and identification. An example might look like this.

Roots         

 

  1. Children are then encouraged to stick the vocab cards on the science wall and then ensure that their SFB is up to date and presentable.

 

Beginning of the lesson: The M.O.S.S lesson.

A science MOSS.

MOSS stands for “Science Mental and Oral Starter.” It is a 5-10 minute session that aims to “warm up” the children’s science skills and enthusiasm. It doesn’t have to be related to the science topic, but should be vocabulary based. Examples are:

  • Give children labels from medication packages-(empty!) and ask them to find works they think are  science words. Group discussion follows when children have collected the words.
  • Play a game of flower bingo-children need to say the name of the plant.
  • Power point of “Name the animal”
  • Learn a song about the topic.
  • Vocab activity sheet: spell it, give an example of it, draw it etc -(SE will give these out)
  • Multi choice identifying definition of the chosen word.

 

Stand- alone lessons.

Our stand- alone lessons are made up of mainly vocabulary based sessions that are carried out throughout the half term and listed in green on the LTPs. They are aimed at closing any gaps in children’s scientific language and to give the children some experience of topics that they may not cover until upper KS2 or haven’t looked at since foundation stage. There are examples of what you are expected to do on the LTPs and suggested resources.

These lessons are to be treated and recorded in SFB as normal science lessons with LOs from the working scientifically section of the national curriculum. If you need any help or questions about these stand-alone lessons please see SE.

 

Investigations and recording sheet.

During one half term there needs to be at least one formal investigation using the school science investigation pro-form. This is available on the shared drive. An example is below. The investigation sheet can be done as a class or in groups. You may need to use the LSA to scribe for LAPs. There can be several mini-investigations which help to develop working scientifically skills. An example may be melting chocolate or putting salt on ice.

 Investigation planning sheet.

Completed as a group.

  • Our investigation question is
  • Can we make a fossil?”
  • “How can we sort and classify rocks”?

 

  • We are measuring/observing

 

“We are looking at, no I mean observing what shape we will get when we try and make a fossil.”

“ We are observing what happens when different rocks are put in acid vinegar.”

 

What could we change?  (Variables).

 

“The animal used and what part of the animal or shell we can used.”

“ The size of the rock and how much vinegar you use.”
 

 

 

What do we need to keep the same?(constants)
The amount of clay and plaster we use and how long we set them, leave them to get hard,”

“About all the same size of the rocks.”

“How long we put them in for.”


 

 

Predictions.

“The plaster will need to, no make a pattern of the animals and the leaf or shell and we will have a fossil, but not a real one cos it takes millions of years.”

 

“We think that some rocks might explode and bang cos acid is dangerous. Some rock might make loads of bubbles.”

 

 

 

Why i/we’ve made these predictions.
“Cos we know and we have learnt that the fossils are underground for ages and there’s lots of rocks on them. That are in the ground and people like Mary Anning dig for them.”

 

“Rocks are hard and acid is strong and dangerous so there will be something big that might happen.”

 

 

Obtaining evidence

 “We will use photographs to look at our fossils.”

“ We are going to record the rocks and acid in the table and what we have learnt.”

 

 

 

Presenting the results.

What I/we thought would happen?

 

see predictions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What actually happened?

Fossils-

“There were different fossils we made and some you could see bits of the animal and other you couldn’t see what thet were cos they were not there.”

 

“Some rocks, there were some bubbles from some rocks but some were not any at all, the vinegar didn’t work at all on the rocks.The slate had some bubbles but the limestone had loads and made the acid go cloudy.”

 

Decide how you are going to show your results.

What could we change/do next time?

* “Do and try and make a fossil for longer and with a fish and flowers.”

* “Use different rocks like all the ones we have in the rock cupboard.”

* Use different types of liquids-can we get different vinegar.?”

 

 

My/our conclusion is

“That fossils take a very long time to make.”

“Some fossils are only bits of fossils.”

“Mary Anning had to work hard to get her fossils.”

 

“Some rocks make bubbles-(we talked about the word release) and some don’t cos Mrs Evans taught us that some rocks have chemicals that make the bubbles.”-(talked about the word react)

 

 

 

 

 

Data and assessment.

Science data is collected at the end of every half term.

Teacher assessment is used and staff need to be aware that the key learning objections to be assessed are the ones expected at the END of KS1, Lower KS2 and Upper KS2. As paper “tests” do not assess working scientifically staff need to ensure that there is science assessment taking place in all science lessons and investigations. To ensure that WS is assessed appropriately staff need to teach WS across the whole curriculum and not as an isolated lesson. Science follows the school assessment policy and as such data needs to be reported on the shared drive. As science coordinator SE will record them on the shared drive if given to me in paper form or emailed to me.  If you have any questions about science assessment please don’t hesitate to ask.

Science homework.

Please ensure that science homework is set regularly. If for example, if you are setting spelling homework please include some science spellings from your science topic. You could also set practical activities, for example list all the animals you see in one week and for older children list the animals and sort them into groups, mammals, insects, birds etc. SE has a display wall in her room for children’s work and encourages them to come and show what they have done for homework and research at home. Please see SE if you need any science homework resources.

 

 

Science Dojos.

As soon as possible staff need to create a “Super Science” category on the class dojos. Three dojos are normally awarded for good work in science, work done at home or science resources they have bought in from home.

 

 

Biodome.

We are lucky enough to have a bio dome – (a large green house environment). It is situated on the middle yard and is used for science investigations and observations. We operate an after school bio-dome club-(when staffing and seasons allow!) The bio dome presents children with the opportunity of engaging in practical science lessons and investigations. Children are encouraged to use the bio dome during break/lunch times by watering and tidying up. It also contains a wormery! SE and site manager Jay Peters have keys.

If you have any questions about the bio dome and how to use it please ask SE.

Science/STEM/STEAM weeks.

Phoenix is well known for its science weeks. These are a week long and have a theme-past examples have been “From class to career” “women in science” and more recently we have been focusing on STEM and STEAM. Our last one incorporated STEAM and saw the school embracing the cross curricular nature of science. We have visitors, workshops, parent sessions and each class has a afternoon of science activities run by SE.

 

e-Bug.

e-bug is a Public health programme of work that covers the dangers of microbes, hygiene and antibiotic awareness. Since 2019, we have been using this initiative in the autumn term. The first year this was completed in school we saw an increase in attendance and ensured that our children were equipped for the COVID 19 pandemic. SE completes planning for the whole school on this occasion and it is recorded in a separate science floor book or in the class floor books. SE will advise staff about this. The resources cover several areas of the science curriculum and are worth investigating for future activities.

For further information go towww.e-Bug.eu               eBug@phe.gov.uk

Any questions, concerns, queries please see Sue Evans. Remember that “Science Rocks at Phoenix!”

 

PHOENIX PRIMARY SCHOOL.

 

Staff science handbook.

 

 

Sue Evans. September 2020.

Staff Science Handbook.

                  

s.evans@phoenixprimaryschool.co.uk

Twitter: @phoenix_science

My room: Opposite the interventions room on the first floor.

In school: Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday-(all day)

Resources and materials.

You will find the science resources located in cupboards in the year 1 and 2 corridor. They are arranged in NC topics with the addition of a “general resources” and “kitchen science” equipment cupboards. I have a good range of science books and resources such as games available in my room.

 If there is anything you need that is not present please let me know.

 To help with re-ordering and replacement of broken materials please let me know if we are running low on specific resources.

If you have any questions or queries on resources please ask. Don’t put off doing an investigation because you can’t access the correct resources.

 

 

Other resources.

  • Staff shared drive.    
  • School website.
  • Twitter
  • Biodome
  • Filing cabinets in SE’s room-ideas for investigations, games and activities.
  • STEM-need to join to access materials but this is free.
  • Newspaper articles.
  • Food labels-especially for MOSS activities.
  • Twinkl-use sparingly.
  • Hamilton science-Can access without having purchased the scheme.
  • BBC Bitesize.
  • You Tube-beware of Americanisms and name changes.
  • Science display boards-(not the science wall in your classroom) These are found outside the hall. Please make children aware of these as they pass!

 

Classroom science wall.

All classes need a science wall in their classroom. Please remember that science is a core subject and the science wall is a non-negotiable and needs to be used to aid children’s understanding and learning. To assist with continuity there are items that have to be present.

If there are any items that you don’t have in your classroom, please ask.

Science classroom wall contents.

1.Title- to comply with the school “Science Rocks” theme there needs to be a science rocks title banner.

2. Working scientifically cards/posters.

3. Science misconception board- (“board” meaning A4 laminated piece of paper).

4. Learning objectives board.

5. M.O.S.S board.

6. Topic relevant vocab cards.

7. Information about graphs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Science wall information: What to look out for.

 

Other notes.

If a child uses a word that isn’t on the wall, encourage them to write it on a vocab card and add it to the list.

Children need to be familiar with the science wall as you…so don’t be afraid to use it with the children.

Encourage the children to use the science wall as you would for the English and maths wall.

Science zone banner helps to focus children on the science wall.

These are working scientifically question prompts. Please refer to these throughout sessions.

Can be the learning objective for the session or a child to write a sentence about what you are learning.

The MISCONCEPTION BOARD-very important. If a cd says something that is incorrect or a misconception, encourage them to write it on a post-it and stick it on the misconception wall. Important to stress that they are not stupid or silly, it there because we need to know what to teach.

Information to assist children in the completion of graphs.

Vocab cards. These are a non-negotiable.  Cd produce them and use in science lessons and any cross curric work.

Clearly labelled as the science wall.

The science wall should be in a designated place in the classroom which is accessible to the children and clearly seen.

 

 

Science floor books.

Science Floor Books.

Phoenix changed to the system of floor books three years ago. It is an on-going process and is subject to review and change.

FS- Science is represented in the reception children’s floor book. This includes pupil voice, mark making and writing, activities and photographs.

        What needs to be included in the science floor books?

It is very important that all these things are included. There will be several moderation sessions for all age groups this year from the authority and you will need to be able to show all children’s work.

  • Front of books need to have a cover identifying what it is, year group and for KS2, names of the children in the group. Pupil voice should also be included on the front cover. An example is below:

…at Phoenix!

2019-20.

Year 3 science floor book.

In this group there is…                                  

 

 

 

*Title page for the topic being taught, including date.

  • Learning objective from the national curriculum. There also needs to be a working scientifically objective.
  • Children’s work needs to be named and shown if it was teacher supported, LSA supported, peer supported or independent.
  • All children should have work in the book-for example if you are drawing a graph or making an observational drawing every child needs one. To save space these can be collated in a book format and attached to a single page.
  • Marking-evidence needs to be seen of in class marking, peer marking, QM –(Quality Mark)- teacher marking. These need to be done for everychild at least once a week. They are most effective when completed during the session. Please indicate an QM on the page in the SFB.
  • Pupil voice-for example, if a child asks a question or addresses a misconception it needs to be recorded in the SFB.
  • Photographs where appropriate, annotated with pupil voice.
  • See-saw.
  • Evidence of practical sessions. For example, dissecting a flower, looking at materials etc can be placed in the SFB- (placing sticky backed plastic over it helps to secure it).

 

 

  • The “fill the gap” stand-alone lesson. These are in the LTPs.
  • At the end of the topic teachers need to complete a “Learning feedback document” which consists of identifying strengths and developments - (or next steps) and a review of the learning. This is a great way of including some pupil voice.
  • The “Learning feedback document” is available on the shared drive or from Sue E. An example is shown below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…at Phoenix.

Learning feedback document

Date  March 2019.         Activity  Review of plant topic.

 

 

 

Developments.

  • The pollination system needs to be covered again-ran out of time. Look at doing it as a stand alone sesson next half term.
  • Needed to get more data handling into the session-but I was doing a review of the links between maths and data handling at the time-since spoken to the maths lead and HT. Tables were used but lacked bar charts, pictograms etc.
  • Develop the use of Vocab grids to walk a long side the homemade cd’s vocab cards
  • Ensure cd get more opportunities to identify common plants and trees-this often isn’t embedded in KS1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Strengths.

  • Good general science knowledge from cd. Used knowledge they had learnt in yrs 1 and 2, esp the names an functions of the parts of plant.
  • Good understanding from most of the cd about what is required to ensure a plant/bulb/ seed to grow and survive.
  • Opportunity to use bio dome to show growth and stages of growth.
  • Maj of cd enjoyed and benefitted from the stand- alone lesson on Earth and space-esp allowing the cd who find writing a barrier to their science

Learning a chance to explore vocabulary.

  • Managed 2 investigations, well. Cd participated and enjoyed working in mixed ability groups.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review of learning.

*Quality Marks-continue to be an issue due to the two week science time table, if a child is away then it could be a month before this is completed.

* Year 3 have a good sound knowledge of plants, but still need to look at pollination as this wasn’t covered due to time.

* Two week time table is still a problem. The main issue being retention.

*HAPs children are performing especially well with an improvement in science spelling, for example see 7.1.19 activity. MAPs and LAPs still need reminders to use vocab wall.

* Investigate relocation of science wall in year 3 as it’s present position can hinder cd’s access.

* Giving the topic of plants more than half a term has had a positive impact-for example more frequent opportunities to observe spring flowers and environments in the biodome.

* Investigate looking at seasonal changes with specific reference to flowers and plants to help with the confusion of spring flowers appearing in January. (possible links with GL here).

* Due to the poor knowledge of plant names-(see in most of the classes)-I have made some simple identification games, which can be used for a starter or a filler if needed.

* Practical activities continue to enhance learning, for example making a physical representation of a plant using our bodies- see 4.2.19

 

Working scientifically.

Working scientifically is a major part of the National Curriculum. It should be taught across the curriculum and not as a separate subject. Your planning and LOs should show not only your LO but your working scientifically LO. This when displayed in the floor book may look like this:

 

Monday 5.9.21.                                           Year 1.

LO: “Identify and name a variety of common wild and garden plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees.” (NC) “Observe closely, using simple equipment” (WS)

These can be typed out or hand written by the children.

Recording WS may be done by pupil voice, recording, photographs, showing graphs, charts or tables.

 

 

You will receive some of these to use in class when discussing a cross curricular word. Display these on the class science wall.

Children should be encouraged to identified cross curricular words, for example on the English walling wall. If children identify these words they should be rewarded by using the class reward system of science dojos.

 

Cross curricular stickers.

 

 

Cross-curricular science word.

 

  

 

 

 

To ensure that children are challenged in their science, staff need to set challenges for the more able children. In a SFB this may not be as obvious as it is in a child’s exercise book. When you have set challenges for high ability children use this sticker in the SFB to identify this activity. These can also be used in cross-curricular science activities.

Science challenge sticker.

 

  

 

Science rocks at Phoenix.

The science challenge.

 

 

Reward and praise stickers.

Staff are to follow the rewards system that can be found in the marking policy. In addition, stickers can be used to reward science work in class and in the SFB. SE has a stock of science stickers if staff require them.       

SEs reward stickers.

 

You have been awarded 5 dojos for excellent science work.

You are a super scientist.

From: Mrs Evans.

Give this ticket to your teacher.

 

 

 

These tickets are given out by SE for children who have worked well in science lessons, done something at home and presents it at school or used science vocabulary in class. Please encourage children to “find me” and celebrate their science work through these tickets. They should be then placed in the SFB.

 

       
   
     
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Science phrases and chants.

At Phoenix we want our children to believe that they are scientists… a “CAN DO” attitude. As a result, we have several phrases that we use to help with science teaching. Children should be rewarded for using these by being given science dojos.

“Maths and science are best buddies”-used to develop the children’s understanding that these two subjects are closely related.

  • “It’s cross curricular!” Making a shape of a cross with their hands the children say this when a cross curricular issue occurs in class. For example describing materials, a poem about plants, discussing habitats in geography. Children should be rewarded with science dojos.
  • “It’s not magic, it’s science.”- Young children particularly are sometimes in awe of investigations or mini experiments and meet this with a statement that its magic. To create the correct attitude towards science we use this phrase to address this mis-conception.
  • Science power words- in the first lesson of a new topic vocabulary cards are produced by the children and placed on the science wall in class. During this activity and throughout science and other lesson please refer to science vocab as “science power words” “These are called science power words because they make us powerful scientists.”

 

Scientist of the term.

At the end of every term staff will be asked to nominate a child to receive the award “Scientist of the Term.” This award goes to a child who has shown great progress in science, maintains an enthusiasm for the subject, helped to develop the subject in school, undertaken research at home. The child is presented with a certificate and small science themed gift during an assembly and parents/friends of the child are invited.

 

MTP and LTP

Science medium term planning should be completed on the schools MTP pro-forma and placed on the shared drive. If SE teachers your science please write “See SEs planning” LTP for science are available from the curriculum overviews and SE produces a LTP which indicates what topic is taught for each half term. Please see SE or the curriculum lead if you have any questions.

 

What does a Phoenix science lesson look like?

“I love science ‘cos we do loads of experiments.” (Former C7 pupil.)

 

Start of a new topic first session.

The first lesson of a new topic is different from the rest of the lessons and always take the same structure and format.

  1. Brief chat on what your new topic is, how long you will be doing the topic for and what are they going to learn?
  2. Discussion in groups-(at this stage it can be mixed ability to encourage children to share everything they might already know about the new topic.) * COVID 19 RESTRICTIONS MAY MEAN THAT CHILDREN CANNOT MOVE ARRANGE THE CLASSROOM. PLEASE REFER TO LATEST SCHOOL ADVICE.

 

  1. Children to write down on post-its what they already know about the new topic. Please ensure that the date and children’s name is on their post-it.

 

  1.  

What we already know about plants.

 

What we want to learn about plants.

Please ensure that this is in the FSB. It is very important at this stage to tell the children that we are not judging them, they are free to say what they want and any “misconceptions” will be written on the mis-conception science wall and looked at throughout the topic to see if we have found out whether it is indeed a misconception and how we know it is. An example might be: “The stem of a plant is solid.” The child would write this on a post-it with their name and date on it and place it on the misconception board.

  1. The children then are introduced to the vocabulary of the topic. Present the children with a word list from the topic-(some vocab lists are available in the science folder on the share drive.) These are to be written in pencil first on a strip of paper and checked by adults to ensure correct spelling. The children are invited to illustrate the word to aid understanding, retention and identification. An example might look like this.

Roots         

 

  1. Children are then encouraged to stick the vocab cards on the science wall and then ensure that their SFB is up to date and presentable.

 

Beginning of the lesson: The M.O.S.S lesson.

A science MOSS.

MOSS stands for “Science Mental and Oral Starter.” It is a 5-10 minute session that aims to “warm up” the children’s science skills and enthusiasm. It doesn’t have to be related to the science topic, but should be vocabulary based. Examples are:

  • Give children labels from medication packages-(empty!) and ask them to find works they think are  science words. Group discussion follows when children have collected the words.
  • Play a game of flower bingo-children need to say the name of the plant.
  • Power point of “Name the animal”
  • Learn a song about the topic.
  • Vocab activity sheet: spell it, give an example of it, draw it etc -(SE will give these out)
  • Multi choice identifying definition of the chosen word.

 

Stand- alone lessons.

Our stand- alone lessons are made up of mainly vocabulary based sessions that are carried out throughout the half term and listed in green on the LTPs. They are aimed at closing any gaps in children’s scientific language and to give the children some experience of topics that they may not cover until upper KS2 or haven’t looked at since foundation stage. There are examples of what you are expected to do on the LTPs and suggested resources.

These lessons are to be treated and recorded in SFB as normal science lessons with LOs from the working scientifically section of the national curriculum. If you need any help or questions about these stand-alone lessons please see SE.

 

Investigations and recording sheet.

During one half term there needs to be at least one formal investigation using the school science investigation pro-form. This is available on the shared drive. An example is below. The investigation sheet can be done as a class or in groups. You may need to use the LSA to scribe for LAPs. There can be several mini-investigations which help to develop working scientifically skills. An example may be melting chocolate or putting salt on ice.

 Investigation planning sheet.

Completed as a group.

  • Our investigation question is
  • Can we make a fossil?”
  • “How can we sort and classify rocks”?

 

  • We are measuring/observing

 

“We are looking at, no I mean observing what shape we will get when we try and make a fossil.”

“ We are observing what happens when different rocks are put in acid vinegar.”

 

What could we change?  (Variables).

 

“The animal used and what part of the animal or shell we can used.”

“ The size of the rock and how much vinegar you use.”
 

 

 

What do we need to keep the same?(constants)
The amount of clay and plaster we use and how long we set them, leave them to get hard,”

“About all the same size of the rocks.”

“How long we put them in for.”


 

 

Predictions.

“The plaster will need to, no make a pattern of the animals and the leaf or shell and we will have a fossil, but not a real one cos it takes millions of years.”

 

“We think that some rocks might explode and bang cos acid is dangerous. Some rock might make loads of bubbles.”

 

 

 

Why i/we’ve made these predictions.
“Cos we know and we have learnt that the fossils are underground for ages and there’s lots of rocks on them. That are in the ground and people like Mary Anning dig for them.”

 

“Rocks are hard and acid is strong and dangerous so there will be something big that might happen.”

 

 

Obtaining evidence

 “We will use photographs to look at our fossils.”

“ We are going to record the rocks and acid in the table and what we have learnt.”

 

 

 

Presenting the results.

What I/we thought would happen?

 

see predictions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What actually happened?

Fossils-

“There were different fossils we made and some you could see bits of the animal and other you couldn’t see what thet were cos they were not there.”

 

“Some rocks, there were some bubbles from some rocks but some were not any at all, the vinegar didn’t work at all on the rocks.The slate had some bubbles but the limestone had loads and made the acid go cloudy.”

 

Decide how you are going to show your results.

What could we change/do next time?

* “Do and try and make a fossil for longer and with a fish and flowers.”

* “Use different rocks like all the ones we have in the rock cupboard.”

* Use different types of liquids-can we get different vinegar.?”

 

 

My/our conclusion is

“That fossils take a very long time to make.”

“Some fossils are only bits of fossils.”

“Mary Anning had to work hard to get her fossils.”

 

“Some rocks make bubbles-(we talked about the word release) and some don’t cos Mrs Evans taught us that some rocks have chemicals that make the bubbles.”-(talked about the word react)

 

 

 

 

 

Data and assessment.

Science data is collected at the end of every half term.

Teacher assessment is used and staff need to be aware that the key learning objections to be assessed are the ones expected at the END of KS1, Lower KS2 and Upper KS2. As paper “tests” do not assess working scientifically staff need to ensure that there is science assessment taking place in all science lessons and investigations. To ensure that WS is assessed appropriately staff need to teach WS across the whole curriculum and not as an isolated lesson. Science follows the school assessment policy and as such data needs to be reported on the shared drive. As science coordinator SE will record them on the shared drive if given to me in paper form or emailed to me.  If you have any questions about science assessment please don’t hesitate to ask.

Science homework.

Please ensure that science homework is set regularly. If for example, if you are setting spelling homework please include some science spellings from your science topic. You could also set practical activities, for example list all the animals you see in one week and for older children list the animals and sort them into groups, mammals, insects, birds etc. SE has a display wall in her room for children’s work and encourages them to come and show what they have done for homework and research at home. Please see SE if you need any science homework resources.

 

 

Science Dojos.

As soon as possible staff need to create a “Super Science” category on the class dojos. Three dojos are normally awarded for good work in science, work done at home or science resources they have bought in from home.

 

 

Biodome.

We are lucky enough to have a bio dome – (a large green house environment). It is situated on the middle yard and is used for science investigations and observations. We operate an after school bio-dome club-(when staffing and seasons allow!) The bio dome presents children with the opportunity of engaging in practical science lessons and investigations. Children are encouraged to use the bio dome during break/lunch times by watering and tidying up. It also contains a wormery! SE and site manager Jay Peters have keys.

If you have any questions about the bio dome and how to use it please ask SE.

Science/STEM/STEAM weeks.

Phoenix is well known for its science weeks. These are a week long and have a theme-past examples have been “From class to career” “women in science” and more recently we have been focusing on STEM and STEAM. Our last one incorporated STEAM and saw the school embracing the cross curricular nature of science. We have visitors, workshops, parent sessions and each class has a afternoon of science activities run by SE.

 

e-Bug.

e-bug is a Public health programme of work that covers the dangers of microbes, hygiene and antibiotic awareness. Since 2019, we have been using this initiative in the autumn term. The first year this was completed in school we saw an increase in attendance and ensured that our children were equipped for the COVID 19 pandemic. SE completes planning for the whole school on this occasion and it is recorded in a separate science floor book or in the class floor books. SE will advise staff about this. The resources cover several areas of the science curriculum and are worth investigating for future activities.

For further information go towww.e-Bug.eu               eBug@phe.gov.uk

Any questions, concerns, queries please see Sue Evans. Remember that “Science Rocks at Phoenix!”

 

PHOENIX PRIMARY SCHOOL.

 

Staff science handbook.

 

 

Sue Evans. September 2020.

Staff Science Handbook.

                  

s.evans@phoenixprimaryschool.co.uk

Twitter: @phoenix_science

My room: Opposite the interventions room on the first floor.

In school: Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday-(all day)

Resources and materials.

You will find the science resources located in cupboards in the year 1 and 2 corridor. They are arranged in NC topics with the addition of a “general resources” and “kitchen science” equipment cupboards. I have a good range of science books and resources such as games available in my room.

 If there is anything you need that is not present please let me know.

 To help with re-ordering and replacement of broken materials please let me know if we are running low on specific resources.

If you have any questions or queries on resources please ask. Don’t put off doing an investigation because you can’t access the correct resources.

 

 

Other resources.

  • Staff shared drive.    
  • School website.
  • Twitter
  • Biodome
  • Filing cabinets in SE’s room-ideas for investigations, games and activities.
  • STEM-need to join to access materials but this is free.
  • Newspaper articles.
  • Food labels-especially for MOSS activities.
  • Twinkl-use sparingly.
  • Hamilton science-Can access without having purchased the scheme.
  • BBC Bitesize.
  • You Tube-beware of Americanisms and name changes.
  • Science display boards-(not the science wall in your classroom) These are found outside the hall. Please make children aware of these as they pass!

 

Classroom science wall.

All classes need a science wall in their classroom. Please remember that science is a core subject and the science wall is a non-negotiable and needs to be used to aid children’s understanding and learning. To assist with continuity there are items that have to be present.

If there are any items that you don’t have in your classroom, please ask.

Science classroom wall contents.

1.Title- to comply with the school “Science Rocks” theme there needs to be a science rocks title banner.

2. Working scientifically cards/posters.

3. Science misconception board- (“board” meaning A4 laminated piece of paper).

4. Learning objectives board.

5. M.O.S.S board.

6. Topic relevant vocab cards.

7. Information about graphs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Science wall information: What to look out for.

 

Other notes.

If a child uses a word that isn’t on the wall, encourage them to write it on a vocab card and add it to the list.

Children need to be familiar with the science wall as you…so don’t be afraid to use it with the children.

Encourage the children to use the science wall as you would for the English and maths wall.

Science zone banner helps to focus children on the science wall.

These are working scientifically question prompts. Please refer to these throughout sessions.

Can be the learning objective for the session or a child to write a sentence about what you are learning.

The MISCONCEPTION BOARD-very important. If a cd says something that is incorrect or a misconception, encourage them to write it on a post-it and stick it on the misconception wall. Important to stress that they are not stupid or silly, it there because we need to know what to teach.

Information to assist children in the completion of graphs.

Vocab cards. These are a non-negotiable.  Cd produce them and use in science lessons and any cross curric work.

Clearly labelled as the science wall.

The science wall should be in a designated place in the classroom which is accessible to the children and clearly seen.

 

 

Science floor books.

Science Floor Books.

Phoenix changed to the system of floor books three years ago. It is an on-going process and is subject to review and change.

FS- Science is represented in the reception children’s floor book. This includes pupil voice, mark making and writing, activities and photographs.

        What needs to be included in the science floor books?

It is very important that all these things are included. There will be several moderation sessions for all age groups this year from the authority and you will need to be able to show all children’s work.

  • Front of books need to have a cover identifying what it is, year group and for KS2, names of the children in the group. Pupil voice should also be included on the front cover. An example is below:

…at Phoenix!

2019-20.

Year 3 science floor book.

In this group there is…                                  

 

 

 

*Title page for the topic being taught, including date.

  • Learning objective from the national curriculum. There also needs to be a working scientifically objective.
  • Children’s work needs to be named and shown if it was teacher supported, LSA supported, peer supported or independent.
  • All children should have work in the book-for example if you are drawing a graph or making an observational drawing every child needs one. To save space these can be collated in a book format and attached to a single page.
  • Marking-evidence needs to be seen of in class marking, peer marking, QM –(Quality Mark)- teacher marking. These need to be done for everychild at least once a week. They are most effective when completed during the session. Please indicate an QM on the page in the SFB.
  • Pupil voice-for example, if a child asks a question or addresses a misconception it needs to be recorded in the SFB.
  • Photographs where appropriate, annotated with pupil voice.
  • See-saw.
  • Evidence of practical sessions. For example, dissecting a flower, looking at materials etc can be placed in the SFB- (placing sticky backed plastic over it helps to secure it).

 

 

  • The “fill the gap” stand-alone lesson. These are in the LTPs.
  • At the end of the topic teachers need to complete a “Learning feedback document” which consists of identifying strengths and developments - (or next steps) and a review of the learning. This is a great way of including some pupil voice.
  • The “Learning feedback document” is available on the shared drive or from Sue E. An example is shown below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…at Phoenix.

Learning feedback document

Date  March 2019.         Activity  Review of plant topic.

 

 

 

Developments.

  • The pollination system needs to be covered again-ran out of time. Look at doing it as a stand alone sesson next half term.
  • Needed to get more data handling into the session-but I was doing a review of the links between maths and data handling at the time-since spoken to the maths lead and HT. Tables were used but lacked bar charts, pictograms etc.
  • Develop the use of Vocab grids to walk a long side the homemade cd’s vocab cards
  • Ensure cd get more opportunities to identify common plants and trees-this often isn’t embedded in KS1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Strengths.

  • Good general science knowledge from cd. Used knowledge they had learnt in yrs 1 and 2, esp the names an functions of the parts of plant.
  • Good understanding from most of the cd about what is required to ensure a plant/bulb/ seed to grow and survive.
  • Opportunity to use bio dome to show growth and stages of growth.
  • Maj of cd enjoyed and benefitted from the stand- alone lesson on Earth and space-esp allowing the cd who find writing a barrier to their science

Learning a chance to explore vocabulary.

  • Managed 2 investigations, well. Cd participated and enjoyed working in mixed ability groups.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review of learning.

*Quality Marks-continue to be an issue due to the two week science time table, if a child is away then it could be a month before this is completed.

* Year 3 have a good sound knowledge of plants, but still need to look at pollination as this wasn’t covered due to time.

* Two week time table is still a problem. The main issue being retention.

*HAPs children are performing especially well with an improvement in science spelling, for example see 7.1.19 activity. MAPs and LAPs still need reminders to use vocab wall.

* Investigate relocation of science wall in year 3 as it’s present position can hinder cd’s access.

* Giving the topic of plants more than half a term has had a positive impact-for example more frequent opportunities to observe spring flowers and environments in the biodome.

* Investigate looking at seasonal changes with specific reference to flowers and plants to help with the confusion of spring flowers appearing in January. (possible links with GL here).

* Due to the poor knowledge of plant names-(see in most of the classes)-I have made some simple identification games, which can be used for a starter or a filler if needed.

* Practical activities continue to enhance learning, for example making a physical representation of a plant using our bodies- see 4.2.19

 

Working scientifically.

Working scientifically is a major part of the National Curriculum. It should be taught across the curriculum and not as a separate subject. Your planning and LOs should show not only your LO but your working scientifically LO. This when displayed in the floor book may look like this:

 

Monday 5.9.21.                                           Year 1.

LO: “Identify and name a variety of common wild and garden plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees.” (NC) “Observe closely, using simple equipment” (WS)

These can be typed out or hand written by the children.

Recording WS may be done by pupil voice, recording, photographs, showing graphs, charts or tables.

 

 

You will receive some of these to use in class when discussing a cross curricular word. Display these on the class science wall.

Children should be encouraged to identified cross curricular words, for example on the English walling wall. If children identify these words they should be rewarded by using the class reward system of science dojos.

 

Cross curricular stickers.

 

 

Cross-curricular science word.

 

  

 

 

 

To ensure that children are challenged in their science, staff need to set challenges for the more able children. In a SFB this may not be as obvious as it is in a child’s exercise book. When you have set challenges for high ability children use this sticker in the SFB to identify this activity. These can also be used in cross-curricular science activities.

Science challenge sticker.

 

  

 

Science rocks at Phoenix.

The science challenge.

 

 

Reward and praise stickers.

Staff are to follow the rewards system that can be found in the marking policy. In addition, stickers can be used to reward science work in class and in the SFB. SE has a stock of science stickers if staff require them.       

SEs reward stickers.

 

You have been awarded 5 dojos for excellent science work.

You are a super scientist.

From: Mrs Evans.

Give this ticket to your teacher.

 

 

 

These tickets are given out by SE for children who have worked well in science lessons, done something at home and presents it at school or used science vocabulary in class. Please encourage children to “find me” and celebrate their science work through these tickets. They should be then placed in the SFB.

 

       
   
     
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Science phrases and chants.

At Phoenix we want our children to believe that they are scientists… a “CAN DO” attitude. As a result, we have several phrases that we use to help with science teaching. Children should be rewarded for using these by being given science dojos.

“Maths and science are best buddies”-used to develop the children’s understanding that these two subjects are closely related.

  • “It’s cross curricular!” Making a shape of a cross with their hands the children say this when a cross curricular issue occurs in class. For example describing materials, a poem about plants, discussing habitats in geography. Children should be rewarded with science dojos.
  • “It’s not magic, it’s science.”- Young children particularly are sometimes in awe of investigations or mini experiments and meet this with a statement that its magic. To create the correct attitude towards science we use this phrase to address this mis-conception.
  • Science power words- in the first lesson of a new topic vocabulary cards are produced by the children and placed on the science wall in class. During this activity and throughout science and other lesson please refer to science vocab as “science power words” “These are called science power words because they make us powerful scientists.”

 

Scientist of the term.

At the end of every term staff will be asked to nominate a child to receive the award “Scientist of the Term.” This award goes to a child who has shown great progress in science, maintains an enthusiasm for the subject, helped to develop the subject in school, undertaken research at home. The child is presented with a certificate and small science themed gift during an assembly and parents/friends of the child are invited.

 

MTP and LTP

Science medium term planning should be completed on the schools MTP pro-forma and placed on the shared drive. If SE teachers your science please write “See SEs planning” LTP for science are available from the curriculum overviews and SE produces a LTP which indicates what topic is taught for each half term. Please see SE or the curriculum lead if you have any questions.

 

What does a Phoenix science lesson look like?

“I love science ‘cos we do loads of experiments.” (Former C7 pupil.)

 

Start of a new topic first session.

The first lesson of a new topic is different from the rest of the lessons and always take the same structure and format.

  1. Brief chat on what your new topic is, how long you will be doing the topic for and what are they going to learn?
  2. Discussion in groups-(at this stage it can be mixed ability to encourage children to share everything they might already know about the new topic.) * COVID 19 RESTRICTIONS MAY MEAN THAT CHILDREN CANNOT MOVE ARRANGE THE CLASSROOM. PLEASE REFER TO LATEST SCHOOL ADVICE.

 

  1. Children to write down on post-its what they already know about the new topic. Please ensure that the date and children’s name is on their post-it.

 

  1.  

What we already know about plants.

 

What we want to learn about plants.

Please ensure that this is in the FSB. It is very important at this stage to tell the children that we are not judging them, they are free to say what they want and any “misconceptions” will be written on the mis-conception science wall and looked at throughout the topic to see if we have found out whether it is indeed a misconception and how we know it is. An example might be: “The stem of a plant is solid.” The child would write this on a post-it with their name and date on it and place it on the misconception board.

  1. The children then are introduced to the vocabulary of the topic. Present the children with a word list from the topic-(some vocab lists are available in the science folder on the share drive.) These are to be written in pencil first on a strip of paper and checked by adults to ensure correct spelling. The children are invited to illustrate the word to aid understanding, retention and identification. An example might look like this.

Roots         

 

  1. Children are then encouraged to stick the vocab cards on the science wall and then ensure that their SFB is up to date and presentable.

 

Beginning of the lesson: The M.O.S.S lesson.

A science MOSS.

MOSS stands for “Science Mental and Oral Starter.” It is a 5-10 minute session that aims to “warm up” the children’s science skills and enthusiasm. It doesn’t have to be related to the science topic, but should be vocabulary based. Examples are:

  • Give children labels from medication packages-(empty!) and ask them to find works they think are  science words. Group discussion follows when children have collected the words.
  • Play a game of flower bingo-children need to say the name of the plant.
  • Power point of “Name the animal”
  • Learn a song about the topic.
  • Vocab activity sheet: spell it, give an example of it, draw it etc -(SE will give these out)
  • Multi choice identifying definition of the chosen word.

 

Stand- alone lessons.

Our stand- alone lessons are made up of mainly vocabulary based sessions that are carried out throughout the half term and listed in green on the LTPs. They are aimed at closing any gaps in children’s scientific language and to give the children some experience of topics that they may not cover until upper KS2 or haven’t looked at since foundation stage. There are examples of what you are expected to do on the LTPs and suggested resources.

These lessons are to be treated and recorded in SFB as normal science lessons with LOs from the working scientifically section of the national curriculum. If you need any help or questions about these stand-alone lessons please see SE.

 

Investigations and recording sheet.

During one half term there needs to be at least one formal investigation using the school science investigation pro-form. This is available on the shared drive. An example is below. The investigation sheet can be done as a class or in groups. You may need to use the LSA to scribe for LAPs. There can be several mini-investigations which help to develop working scientifically skills. An example may be melting chocolate or putting salt on ice.

 Investigation planning sheet.

Completed as a group.

  • Our investigation question is
  • Can we make a fossil?”
  • “How can we sort and classify rocks”?

 

  • We are measuring/observing

 

“We are looking at, no I mean observing what shape we will get when we try and make a fossil.”

“ We are observing what happens when different rocks are put in acid vinegar.”

 

What could we change?  (Variables).

 

“The animal used and what part of the animal or shell we can used.”

“ The size of the rock and how much vinegar you use.”
 

 

 

What do we need to keep the same?(constants)
The amount of clay and plaster we use and how long we set them, leave them to get hard,”

“About all the same size of the rocks.”

“How long we put them in for.”


 

 

Predictions.

“The plaster will need to, no make a pattern of the animals and the leaf or shell and we will have a fossil, but not a real one cos it takes millions of years.”

 

“We think that some rocks might explode and bang cos acid is dangerous. Some rock might make loads of bubbles.”

 

 

 

Why i/we’ve made these predictions.
“Cos we know and we have learnt that the fossils are underground for ages and there’s lots of rocks on them. That are in the ground and people like Mary Anning dig for them.”

 

“Rocks are hard and acid is strong and dangerous so there will be something big that might happen.”

 

 

Obtaining evidence

 “We will use photographs to look at our fossils.”

“ We are going to record the rocks and acid in the table and what we have learnt.”

 

 

 

Presenting the results.

What I/we thought would happen?

 

see predictions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What actually happened?

Fossils-

“There were different fossils we made and some you could see bits of the animal and other you couldn’t see what thet were cos they were not there.”

 

“Some rocks, there were some bubbles from some rocks but some were not any at all, the vinegar didn’t work at all on the rocks.The slate had some bubbles but the limestone had loads and made the acid go cloudy.”

 

Decide how you are going to show your results.

What could we change/do next time?

* “Do and try and make a fossil for longer and with a fish and flowers.”

* “Use different rocks like all the ones we have in the rock cupboard.”

* Use different types of liquids-can we get different vinegar.?”

 

 

My/our conclusion is

“That fossils take a very long time to make.”

“Some fossils are only bits of fossils.”

“Mary Anning had to work hard to get her fossils.”

 

“Some rocks make bubbles-(we talked about the word release) and some don’t cos Mrs Evans taught us that some rocks have chemicals that make the bubbles.”-(talked about the word react)

 

 

 

 

 

Data and assessment.

Science data is collected at the end of every half term.

Teacher assessment is used and staff need to be aware that the key learning objections to be assessed are the ones expected at the END of KS1, Lower KS2 and Upper KS2. As paper “tests” do not assess working scientifically staff need to ensure that there is science assessment taking place in all science lessons and investigations. To ensure that WS is assessed appropriately staff need to teach WS across the whole curriculum and not as an isolated lesson. Science follows the school assessment policy and as such data needs to be reported on the shared drive. As science coordinator SE will record them on the shared drive if given to me in paper form or emailed to me.  If you have any questions about science assessment please don’t hesitate to ask.

Science homework.

Please ensure that science homework is set regularly. If for example, if you are setting spelling homework please include some science spellings from your science topic. You could also set practical activities, for example list all the animals you see in one week and for older children list the animals and sort them into groups, mammals, insects, birds etc. SE has a display wall in her room for children’s work and encourages them to come and show what they have done for homework and research at home. Please see SE if you need any science homework resources.

 

 

Science Dojos.

As soon as possible staff need to create a “Super Science” category on the class dojos. Three dojos are normally awarded for good work in science, work done at home or science resources they have bought in from home.

 

 

Biodome.

We are lucky enough to have a bio dome – (a large green house environment). It is situated on the middle yard and is used for science investigations and observations. We operate an after school bio-dome club-(when staffing and seasons allow!) The bio dome presents children with the opportunity of engaging in practical science lessons and investigations. Children are encouraged to use the bio dome during break/lunch times by watering and tidying up. It also contains a wormery! SE and site manager Jay Peters have keys.

If you have any questions about the bio dome and how to use it please ask SE.

Science/STEM/STEAM weeks.

Phoenix is well known for its science weeks. These are a week long and have a theme-past examples have been “From class to career” “women in science” and more recently we have been focusing on STEM and STEAM. Our last one incorporated STEAM and saw the school embracing the cross curricular nature of science. We have visitors, workshops, parent sessions and each class has a afternoon of science activities run by SE.

 

e-Bug.

e-bug is a Public health programme of work that covers the dangers of microbes, hygiene and antibiotic awareness. Since 2019, we have been using this initiative in the autumn term. The first year this was completed in school we saw an increase in attendance and ensured that our children were equipped for the COVID 19 pandemic. SE completes planning for the whole school on this occasion and it is recorded in a separate science floor book or in the class floor books. SE will advise staff about this. The resources cover several areas of the science curriculum and are worth investigating for future activities.

For further information go towww.e-Bug.eu               eBug@phe.gov.uk

Any questions, concerns, queries please see Sue Evans. Remember that “Science Rocks at Phoenix!”

 

PHOENIX PRIMARY SCHOOL.

 

Staff science handbook.

 

 

Sue Evans. September 2020.

Staff Science Handbook.

                  

s.evans@phoenixprimaryschool.co.uk

Twitter: @phoenix_science

My room: Opposite the interventions room on the first floor.

In school: Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday-(all day)

Resources and materials.

You will find the science resources located in cupboards in the year 1 and 2 corridor. They are arranged in NC topics with the addition of a “general resources” and “kitchen science” equipment cupboards. I have a good range of science books and resources such as games available in my room.

 If there is anything you need that is not present please let me know.

 To help with re-ordering and replacement of broken materials please let me know if we are running low on specific resources.

If you have any questions or queries on resources please ask. Don’t put off doing an investigation because you can’t access the correct resources.

 

 

Other resources.

  • Staff shared drive.    
  • School website.
  • Twitter
  • Biodome
  • Filing cabinets in SE’s room-ideas for investigations, games and activities.
  • STEM-need to join to access materials but this is free.
  • Newspaper articles.
  • Food labels-especially for MOSS activities.
  • Twinkl-use sparingly.
  • Hamilton science-Can access without having purchased the scheme.
  • BBC Bitesize.
  • You Tube-beware of Americanisms and name changes.
  • Science display boards-(not the science wall in your classroom) These are found outside the hall. Please make children aware of these as they pass!

 

Classroom science wall.

All classes need a science wall in their classroom. Please remember that science is a core subject and the science wall is a non-negotiable and needs to be used to aid children’s understanding and learning. To assist with continuity there are items that have to be present.

If there are any items that you don’t have in your classroom, please ask.

Science classroom wall contents.

1.Title- to comply with the school “Science Rocks” theme there needs to be a science rocks title banner.

2. Working scientifically cards/posters.

3. Science misconception board- (“board” meaning A4 laminated piece of paper).

4. Learning objectives board.

5. M.O.S.S board.

6. Topic relevant vocab cards.

7. Information about graphs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Science wall information: What to look out for.

 

Other notes.

If a child uses a word that isn’t on the wall, encourage them to write it on a vocab card and add it to the list.

Children need to be familiar with the science wall as you…so don’t be afraid to use it with the children.

Encourage the children to use the science wall as you would for the English and maths wall.

Science zone banner helps to focus children on the science wall.

These are working scientifically question prompts. Please refer to these throughout sessions.

Can be the learning objective for the session or a child to write a sentence about what you are learning.

The MISCONCEPTION BOARD-very important. If a cd says something that is incorrect or a misconception, encourage them to write it on a post-it and stick it on the misconception wall. Important to stress that they are not stupid or silly, it there because we need to know what to teach.

Information to assist children in the completion of graphs.

Vocab cards. These are a non-negotiable.  Cd produce them and use in science lessons and any cross curric work.

Clearly labelled as the science wall.

The science wall should be in a designated place in the classroom which is accessible to the children and clearly seen.

 

 

Science floor books.

Science Floor Books.

Phoenix changed to the system of floor books three years ago. It is an on-going process and is subject to review and change.

FS- Science is represented in the reception children’s floor book. This includes pupil voice, mark making and writing, activities and photographs.

        What needs to be included in the science floor books?

It is very important that all these things are included. There will be several moderation sessions for all age groups this year from the authority and you will need to be able to show all children’s work.

  • Front of books need to have a cover identifying what it is, year group and for KS2, names of the children in the group. Pupil voice should also be included on the front cover. An example is below:

…at Phoenix!

2019-20.

Year 3 science floor book.

In this group there is…                                  

 

 

 

*Title page for the topic being taught, including date.

  • Learning objective from the national curriculum. There also needs to be a working scientifically objective.
  • Children’s work needs to be named and shown if it was teacher supported, LSA supported, peer supported or independent.
  • All children should have work in the book-for example if you are drawing a graph or making an observational drawing every child needs one. To save space these can be collated in a book format and attached to a single page.
  • Marking-evidence needs to be seen of in class marking, peer marking, QM –(Quality Mark)- teacher marking. These need to be done for everychild at least once a week. They are most effective when completed during the session. Please indicate an QM on the page in the SFB.
  • Pupil voice-for example, if a child asks a question or addresses a misconception it needs to be recorded in the SFB.
  • Photographs where appropriate, annotated with pupil voice.
  • See-saw.
  • Evidence of practical sessions. For example, dissecting a flower, looking at materials etc can be placed in the SFB- (placing sticky backed plastic over it helps to secure it).

 

 

  • The “fill the gap” stand-alone lesson. These are in the LTPs.
  • At the end of the topic teachers need to complete a “Learning feedback document” which consists of identifying strengths and developments - (or next steps) and a review of the learning. This is a great way of including some pupil voice.
  • The “Learning feedback document” is available on the shared drive or from Sue E. An example is shown below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…at Phoenix.

Learning feedback document

Date  March 2019.         Activity  Review of plant topic.

 

 

 

Developments.

  • The pollination system needs to be covered again-ran out of time. Look at doing it as a stand alone sesson next half term.
  • Needed to get more data handling into the session-but I was doing a review of the links between maths and data handling at the time-since spoken to the maths lead and HT. Tables were used but lacked bar charts, pictograms etc.
  • Develop the use of Vocab grids to walk a long side the homemade cd’s vocab cards
  • Ensure cd get more opportunities to identify common plants and trees-this often isn’t embedded in KS1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Strengths.

  • Good general science knowledge from cd. Used knowledge they had learnt in yrs 1 and 2, esp the names an functions of the parts of plant.
  • Good understanding from most of the cd about what is required to ensure a plant/bulb/ seed to grow and survive.
  • Opportunity to use bio dome to show growth and stages of growth.
  • Maj of cd enjoyed and benefitted from the stand- alone lesson on Earth and space-esp allowing the cd who find writing a barrier to their science

Learning a chance to explore vocabulary.

  • Managed 2 investigations, well. Cd participated and enjoyed working in mixed ability groups.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review of learning.

*Quality Marks-continue to be an issue due to the two week science time table, if a child is away then it could be a month before this is completed.

* Year 3 have a good sound knowledge of plants, but still need to look at pollination as this wasn’t covered due to time.

* Two week time table is still a problem. The main issue being retention.

*HAPs children are performing especially well with an improvement in science spelling, for example see 7.1.19 activity. MAPs and LAPs still need reminders to use vocab wall.

* Investigate relocation of science wall in year 3 as it’s present position can hinder cd’s access.

* Giving the topic of plants more than half a term has had a positive impact-for example more frequent opportunities to observe spring flowers and environments in the biodome.

* Investigate looking at seasonal changes with specific reference to flowers and plants to help with the confusion of spring flowers appearing in January. (possible links with GL here).

* Due to the poor knowledge of plant names-(see in most of the classes)-I have made some simple identification games, which can be used for a starter or a filler if needed.

* Practical activities continue to enhance learning, for example making a physical representation of a plant using our bodies- see 4.2.19

 

Working scientifically.

Working scientifically is a major part of the National Curriculum. It should be taught across the curriculum and not as a separate subject. Your planning and LOs should show not only your LO but your working scientifically LO. This when displayed in the floor book may look like this:

 

Monday 5.9.21.                                           Year 1.

LO: “Identify and name a variety of common wild and garden plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees.” (NC) “Observe closely, using simple equipment” (WS)

These can be typed out or hand written by the children.

Recording WS may be done by pupil voice, recording, photographs, showing graphs, charts or tables.

 

 

You will receive some of these to use in class when discussing a cross curricular word. Display these on the class science wall.

Children should be encouraged to identified cross curricular words, for example on the English walling wall. If children identify these words they should be rewarded by using the class reward system of science dojos.

 

Cross curricular stickers.

 

 

Cross-curricular science word.

 

  

 

 

 

To ensure that children are challenged in their science, staff need to set challenges for the more able children. In a SFB this may not be as obvious as it is in a child’s exercise book. When you have set challenges for high ability children use this sticker in the SFB to identify this activity. These can also be used in cross-curricular science activities.

Science challenge sticker.

 

  

 

Science rocks at Phoenix.

The science challenge.

 

 

Reward and praise stickers.

Staff are to follow the rewards system that can be found in the marking policy. In addition, stickers can be used to reward science work in class and in the SFB. SE has a stock of science stickers if staff require them.       

SEs reward stickers.

 

You have been awarded 5 dojos for excellent science work.

You are a super scientist.

From: Mrs Evans.

Give this ticket to your teacher.

 

 

 

These tickets are given out by SE for children who have worked well in science lessons, done something at home and presents it at school or used science vocabulary in class. Please encourage children to “find me” and celebrate their science work through these tickets. They should be then placed in the SFB.

 

       
   
     
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Science phrases and chants.

At Phoenix we want our children to believe that they are scientists… a “CAN DO” attitude. As a result, we have several phrases that we use to help with science teaching. Children should be rewarded for using these by being given science dojos.

“Maths and science are best buddies”-used to develop the children’s understanding that these two subjects are closely related.

  • “It’s cross curricular!” Making a shape of a cross with their hands the children say this when a cross curricular issue occurs in class. For example describing materials, a poem about plants, discussing habitats in geography. Children should be rewarded with science dojos.
  • “It’s not magic, it’s science.”- Young children particularly are sometimes in awe of investigations or mini experiments and meet this with a statement that its magic. To create the correct attitude towards science we use this phrase to address this mis-conception.
  • Science power words- in the first lesson of a new topic vocabulary cards are produced by the children and placed on the science wall in class. During this activity and throughout science and other lesson please refer to science vocab as “science power words” “These are called science power words because they make us powerful scientists.”

 

Scientist of the term.

At the end of every term staff will be asked to nominate a child to receive the award “Scientist of the Term.” This award goes to a child who has shown great progress in science, maintains an enthusiasm for the subject, helped to develop the subject in school, undertaken research at home. The child is presented with a certificate and small science themed gift during an assembly and parents/friends of the child are invited.

 

MTP and LTP

Science medium term planning should be completed on the schools MTP pro-forma and placed on the shared drive. If SE teachers your science please write “See SEs planning” LTP for science are available from the curriculum overviews and SE produces a LTP which indicates what topic is taught for each half term. Please see SE or the curriculum lead if you have any questions.

 

What does a Phoenix science lesson look like?

“I love science ‘cos we do loads of experiments.” (Former C7 pupil.)

 

Start of a new topic first session.

The first lesson of a new topic is different from the rest of the lessons and always take the same structure and format.

  1. Brief chat on what your new topic is, how long you will be doing the topic for and what are they going to learn?
  2. Discussion in groups-(at this stage it can be mixed ability to encourage children to share everything they might already know about the new topic.) * COVID 19 RESTRICTIONS MAY MEAN THAT CHILDREN CANNOT MOVE ARRANGE THE CLASSROOM. PLEASE REFER TO LATEST SCHOOL ADVICE.

 

  1. Children to write down on post-its what they already know about the new topic. Please ensure that the date and children’s name is on their post-it.

 

  1.  

What we already know about plants.

 

What we want to learn about plants.

Please ensure that this is in the FSB. It is very important at this stage to tell the children that we are not judging them, they are free to say what they want and any “misconceptions” will be written on the mis-conception science wall and looked at throughout the topic to see if we have found out whether it is indeed a misconception and how we know it is. An example might be: “The stem of a plant is solid.” The child would write this on a post-it with their name and date on it and place it on the misconception board.

  1. The children then are introduced to the vocabulary of the topic. Present the children with a word list from the topic-(some vocab lists are available in the science folder on the share drive.) These are to be written in pencil first on a strip of paper and checked by adults to ensure correct spelling. The children are invited to illustrate the word to aid understanding, retention and identification. An example might look like this.

Roots         

 

  1. Children are then encouraged to stick the vocab cards on the science wall and then ensure that their SFB is up to date and presentable.

 

Beginning of the lesson: The M.O.S.S lesson.

A science MOSS.

MOSS stands for “Science Mental and Oral Starter.” It is a 5-10 minute session that aims to “warm up” the children’s science skills and enthusiasm. It doesn’t have to be related to the science topic, but should be vocabulary based. Examples are:

  • Give children labels from medication packages-(empty!) and ask them to find works they think are  science words. Group discussion follows when children have collected the words.
  • Play a game of flower bingo-children need to say the name of the plant.
  • Power point of “Name the animal”
  • Learn a song about the topic.
  • Vocab activity sheet: spell it, give an example of it, draw it etc -(SE will give these out)
  • Multi choice identifying definition of the chosen word.

 

Stand- alone lessons.

Our stand- alone lessons are made up of mainly vocabulary based sessions that are carried out throughout the half term and listed in green on the LTPs. They are aimed at closing any gaps in children’s scientific language and to give the children some experience of topics that they may not cover until upper KS2 or haven’t looked at since foundation stage. There are examples of what you are expected to do on the LTPs and suggested resources.

These lessons are to be treated and recorded in SFB as normal science lessons with LOs from the working scientifically section of the national curriculum. If you need any help or questions about these stand-alone lessons please see SE.

 

Investigations and recording sheet.

During one half term there needs to be at least one formal investigation using the school science investigation pro-form. This is available on the shared drive. An example is below. The investigation sheet can be done as a class or in groups. You may need to use the LSA to scribe for LAPs. There can be several mini-investigations which help to develop working scientifically skills. An example may be melting chocolate or putting salt on ice.

 Investigation planning sheet.

Completed as a group.

  • Our investigation question is
  • Can we make a fossil?”
  • “How can we sort and classify rocks”?

 

  • We are measuring/observing

 

“We are looking at, no I mean observing what shape we will get when we try and make a fossil.”

“ We are observing what happens when different rocks are put in acid vinegar.”

 

What could we change?  (Variables).

 

“The animal used and what part of the animal or shell we can used.”

“ The size of the rock and how much vinegar you use.”
 

 

 

What do we need to keep the same?(constants)
The amount of clay and plaster we use and how long we set them, leave them to get hard,”

“About all the same size of the rocks.”

“How long we put them in for.”


 

 

Predictions.

“The plaster will need to, no make a pattern of the animals and the leaf or shell and we will have a fossil, but not a real one cos it takes millions of years.”

 

“We think that some rocks might explode and bang cos acid is dangerous. Some rock might make loads of bubbles.”

 

 

 

Why i/we’ve made these predictions.
“Cos we know and we have learnt that the fossils are underground for ages and there’s lots of rocks on them. That are in the ground and people like Mary Anning dig for them.”

 

“Rocks are hard and acid is strong and dangerous so there will be something big that might happen.”

 

 

Obtaining evidence

 “We will use photographs to look at our fossils.”

“ We are going to record the rocks and acid in the table and what we have learnt.”

 

 

 

Presenting the results.

What I/we thought would happen?

 

see predictions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What actually happened?

Fossils-

“There were different fossils we made and some you could see bits of the animal and other you couldn’t see what thet were cos they were not there.”

 

“Some rocks, there were some bubbles from some rocks but some were not any at all, the vinegar didn’t work at all on the rocks.The slate had some bubbles but the limestone had loads and made the acid go cloudy.”

 

Decide how you are going to show your results.

What could we change/do next time?

* “Do and try and make a fossil for longer and with a fish and flowers.”

* “Use different rocks like all the ones we have in the rock cupboard.”

* Use different types of liquids-can we get different vinegar.?”

 

 

My/our conclusion is

“That fossils take a very long time to make.”

“Some fossils are only bits of fossils.”

“Mary Anning had to work hard to get her fossils.”

 

“Some rocks make bubbles-(we talked about the word release) and some don’t cos Mrs Evans taught us that some rocks have chemicals that make the bubbles.”-(talked about the word react)

 

 

 

 

 

Data and assessment.

Science data is collected at the end of every half term.

Teacher assessment is used and staff need to be aware that the key learning objections to be assessed are the ones expected at the END of KS1, Lower KS2 and Upper KS2. As paper “tests” do not assess working scientifically staff need to ensure that there is science assessment taking place in all science lessons and investigations. To ensure that WS is assessed appropriately staff need to teach WS across the whole curriculum and not as an isolated lesson. Science follows the school assessment policy and as such data needs to be reported on the shared drive. As science coordinator SE will record them on the shared drive if given to me in paper form or emailed to me.  If you have any questions about science assessment please don’t hesitate to ask.

Science homework.

Please ensure that science homework is set regularly. If for example, if you are setting spelling homework please include some science spellings from your science topic. You could also set practical activities, for example list all the animals you see in one week and for older children list the animals and sort them into groups, mammals, insects, birds etc. SE has a display wall in her room for children’s work and encourages them to come and show what they have done for homework and research at home. Please see SE if you need any science homework resources.

 

 

Science Dojos.

As soon as possible staff need to create a “Super Science” category on the class dojos. Three dojos are normally awarded for good work in science, work done at home or science resources they have bought in from home.

 

 

Biodome.

We are lucky enough to have a bio dome – (a large green house environment). It is situated on the middle yard and is used for science investigations and observations. We operate an after school bio-dome club-(when staffing and seasons allow!) The bio dome presents children with the opportunity of engaging in practical science lessons and investigations. Children are encouraged to use the bio dome during break/lunch times by watering and tidying up. It also contains a wormery! SE and site manager Jay Peters have keys.

If you have any questions about the bio dome and how to use it please ask SE.

Science/STEM/STEAM weeks.

Phoenix is well known for its science weeks. These are a week long and have a theme-past examples have been “From class to career” “women in science” and more recently we have been focusing on STEM and STEAM. Our last one incorporated STEAM and saw the school embracing the cross curricular nature of science. We have visitors, workshops, parent sessions and each class has a afternoon of science activities run by SE.

 

e-Bug.

e-bug is a Public health programme of work that covers the dangers of microbes, hygiene and antibiotic awareness. Since 2019, we have been using this initiative in the autumn term. The first year this was completed in school we saw an increase in attendance and ensured that our children were equipped for the COVID 19 pandemic. SE completes planning for the whole school on this occasion and it is recorded in a separate science floor book or in the class floor books. SE will advise staff about this. The resources cover several areas of the science curriculum and are worth investigating for future activities.

For further information go towww.e-Bug.eu               eBug@phe.gov.uk

Any questions, concerns, queries please see Sue Evans. Remember that “Science Rocks at Phoenix!”

 

PHOENIX PRIMARY SCHOOL.

 

Staff science handbook.

 

 

Sue Evans. September 2020.

 

     

 

Calendar Dates

  • There are no events for the next 10 weeks.
Please see Key Information for up to date COVID 19 information & advice. School reopens Thursday 1st September with staggered start times, to find the time for each individual class please go to the Key Information section.
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