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Phoenix Primary School ‘Where We Rise to the Challenge’

Theme

Intent

Geography and the National Curriculum

Geography is a National Curriculum foundation subject. The programme of study outlined in the long-term planning make up the content of the school’s geography curriculum. All children are entitled access to the programmes of study at a level appropriate to the needs of the individual child. The knowledge, skills and understanding in the programmes of study identify the aspects of geography in which children make progress:

    • Geographical enquiry and skills.
    • Knowledge and understanding of places.
    • Knowledge and understanding of patterns and processes.
    • Knowledge and understanding of environmental change and sustainable development.

Aims

  • Develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places – both terrestrial and marine – including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes.

 

  • Understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time.

 

 

Are competent in the geographical skills needed to:

 

  • Collect analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes.
  • Interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

 

Teaching will ensure that geographical enquiry and skills are used when developing knowledge and understanding of places, patterns and processes, and environmental change and sustainable development. These aspects will be developed through the study of places and themes set out in the breadth of study. All four aspects are not developed in every place or theme, although all will include elements of geographical enquiry or skills.

 

4

Implementation

Planning and Delivery

Geography has many links with other curriculum areas including English, Drama, History, Art, R.E., Computing and PSHE, whilst always monitoring the children’s mental health and wellbeing. Also, in delivery of lessons VRFs will be used to check and monitor the children’s emotional intelligence and to ensure they are able to regulate.

 

Both Key Stage 1 and 2 will now follow the National Curriculum 2014. Activities both within the classroom and outside are planned to encourage full participation by all children irrespective of ability. Fieldwork activities are an important part of geography and form an integral part of geography curriculum planning. The geography curriculum will be delivered by class teachers.

Curriculum Path 2014

In Foundation Stage, pupils develop their understanding of the world, people and their communities and technology. This includes investigating history of different communities, their routines and customs and also, looking at the world in relation to ourselves and our place on the globe. These areas can be explored through different themes, which often have links with other subjects.

At Key stage 1, pupils should be taught:

Location knowledge

  • Name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans.

  • Name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas.

 

Place knowledge

  • Understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the United Kingdom, and of a small area in a contrasting non-European country.


 

Human and physical geography


  • Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles.

 

Use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to:

  • Key physical features, including: beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation, season and weather.


 

Key human features, including: city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, port, harbour and shop.

 

Geographical skills and fieldwork

  • Use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries, as well as the countries, continents and oceans studied at this key stage.

  • Use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language (e.g. near and far; left and right) to describe the location of features and routes on a map.
  • Use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features; devise a simple map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key.
  • Use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment.

 

At Key Stage 2, pupils should be taught:

Location knowledge

  • Locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities.
  • Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.
  • Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night).

 

Place knowledge

  • Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America.

 

Human and physical geography

Describe and understand key aspects of:

  • Physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle.
  • Human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

 

Geographical skills and fieldwork

  • Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.
  • Use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.
  • Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

 

 

Differentiation

 

Differentiation forms an integral part of planning in Geography. By differentiation may be ~ task/by learning objective/by outcome/by teacher support/by teaching methods/by resources (See Inclusion policy). Assessment opportunities are being built into study units and will to the whole school policy on N.C. assessment, against which value and reliable judgements can be made to assist children’s learning. The majority of children are expected to perform within the range of levels 1 to 3 by the end of KS 1 and between levels 2 to 5 by the end of KS 2, with level 4 being the norm.

 

 

Equal Opportunities

 

All teaching and non-teaching staff should ensure that all pupils, irrespective of gender, ability, ethnicity and social circumstances, have access to, and make the greatest progress possible, in all areas of the Curriculum.

 

Supporting children with SEND

There is an expectation that learning will be adapted for all SEND pupils to enable access to the full curriculum, alongside their peers and to receive ambitious high quality first teaching to acquire the knowledge and cultural capital they will need to succeed in life. This may involve scaffolded modelling and resourcing, and adjusted levels of support to meet individual needs, where appropriate, whilst promoting increased levels of fluency and independence in preparation for their next stage of education, empowering them to achieve their full potential.

See Special Education Needs Policy for more details.

 

Supporting children with EAL

Teaching and learning will be adapted appropriately to enable pupils learning EAL full access to the wider curriculum by: · Accommodating the language proficiency levels of all pupils learning EAL. · Considering the cognitive potential of EAL learners and planning appropriately challenging tasks that allow pupils to demonstrate content knowledge. · Setting subject-specific language objectives that will promote language learning progress. · Integrating the teaching of language skills necessary for academic success with content teaching, illustrating to learners how language works in the context of the subject (e.g. the language of enquiry in science). · Employing pedagogical approaches to teaching and learning that promote language development (e.g. using visuals/realia to support spoken explanations, explicit vocabulary teaching, using first languages as a tool for learning, collaborative learning, scaffolding and modelling). EAL learners will be engaged in purposeful, language-rich lessons that reflect their lived experiences and draw on their funds of knowledge, allowing them to acquire the language skills, curriculum knowledge and cultural capital they need to become global citizens of the future.

 

Resources

Children will have access to a variety of resources to aid their learning that include; atlases, maps, photographs (including aerial), compasses, measuring equipment, books and games. Geography resources can be found in the resource cupboard in clearly labelled boxes and are accessible to all staff who are responsible for the safe return and tidy storage of used or borrowed material.

4D Room

Pupils have access to the 4D room, which can be used for developing cross curricular writing whilst also giving an insight to different environments or stages in the past. The website is regularly updated with photographs of learning in the 4D room. It also provides opportunities for parents to take part in workshops and see first hand how the 4D room has enhanced learning by viewing examples of work and talking to the children themselves.

Impact

 

Assessment

Children will be assessed against 3 criteria’s; emerging, meeting or exceeding expectations. Teachers should judge which description best fits the pupil’s performance. It is important in the assessment of Geography that the children are able to communicate geographical information, through maps numerical and quantitative skills.

4

Monitoring

 

  • Book scrutiny to take place every term.
  • Pupil voice to be taken every term.
  • Assessment monitoring sheets to be completed after every term highlighting the children that are in each criteria.
  • Learning walks.
  • Timetabled visits to all year groups.
  • Observations yearly.

 

Co-ordinator Responsibility

The member of staff with responsibility for the co-ordination of geography will augment, advise on and support the development of geography and its provision throughout the school.

Intent

Geography and the National Curriculum

Geography is a National Curriculum foundation subject. The programme of study outlined in the long-term planning make up the content of the school’s geography curriculum. All children are entitled access to the programmes of study at a level appropriate to the needs of the individual child. The knowledge, skills and understanding in the programmes of study identify the aspects of geography in which children make progress:

    • Geographical enquiry and skills.
    • Knowledge and understanding of places.
    • Knowledge and understanding of patterns and processes.
    • Knowledge and understanding of environmental change and sustainable development.

Aims

  • Develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places – both terrestrial and marine – including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes.

 

  • Understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time.

 

 

Are competent in the geographical skills needed to:

 

  • Collect analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes.
  • Interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

 

Teaching will ensure that geographical enquiry and skills are used when developing knowledge and understanding of places, patterns and processes, and environmental change and sustainable development. These aspects will be developed through the study of places and themes set out in the breadth of study. All four aspects are not developed in every place or theme, although all will include elements of geographical enquiry or skills.

 

4

Implementation

Planning and Delivery

Geography has many links with other curriculum areas including English, Drama, History, Art, R.E., Computing and PSHE, whilst always monitoring the children’s mental health and wellbeing. Also, in delivery of lessons VRFs will be used to check and monitor the children’s emotional intelligence and to ensure they are able to regulate.

 

Both Key Stage 1 and 2 will now follow the National Curriculum 2014. Activities both within the classroom and outside are planned to encourage full participation by all children irrespective of ability. Fieldwork activities are an important part of geography and form an integral part of geography curriculum planning. The geography curriculum will be delivered by class teachers.

Curriculum Path 2014

In Foundation Stage, pupils develop their understanding of the world, people and their communities and technology. This includes investigating history of different communities, their routines and customs and also, looking at the world in relation to ourselves and our place on the globe. These areas can be explored through different themes, which often have links with other subjects.

At Key stage 1, pupils should be taught:

Location knowledge

  • Name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans.

  • Name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas.

 

Place knowledge

  • Understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the United Kingdom, and of a small area in a contrasting non-European country.


 

Human and physical geography


  • Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles.

 

Use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to:

  • Key physical features, including: beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation, season and weather.


 

Key human features, including: city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, port, harbour and shop.

 

Geographical skills and fieldwork

  • Use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries, as well as the countries, continents and oceans studied at this key stage.

  • Use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language (e.g. near and far; left and right) to describe the location of features and routes on a map.
  • Use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features; devise a simple map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key.
  • Use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment.

 

At Key Stage 2, pupils should be taught:

Location knowledge

  • Locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities.
  • Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.
  • Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night).

 

Place knowledge

  • Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America.

 

Human and physical geography

Describe and understand key aspects of:

  • Physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle.
  • Human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

 

Geographical skills and fieldwork

  • Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.
  • Use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.
  • Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

 

 

Differentiation

 

Differentiation forms an integral part of planning in Geography. By differentiation may be ~ task/by learning objective/by outcome/by teacher support/by teaching methods/by resources (See Inclusion policy). Assessment opportunities are being built into study units and will to the whole school policy on N.C. assessment, against which value and reliable judgements can be made to assist children’s learning. The majority of children are expected to perform within the range of levels 1 to 3 by the end of KS 1 and between levels 2 to 5 by the end of KS 2, with level 4 being the norm.

 

 

Equal Opportunities

 

All teaching and non-teaching staff should ensure that all pupils, irrespective of gender, ability, ethnicity and social circumstances, have access to, and make the greatest progress possible, in all areas of the Curriculum.

 

Supporting children with SEND

There is an expectation that learning will be adapted for all SEND pupils to enable access to the full curriculum, alongside their peers and to receive ambitious high quality first teaching to acquire the knowledge and cultural capital they will need to succeed in life. This may involve scaffolded modelling and resourcing, and adjusted levels of support to meet individual needs, where appropriate, whilst promoting increased levels of fluency and independence in preparation for their next stage of education, empowering them to achieve their full potential.

See Special Education Needs Policy for more details.

 

Supporting children with EAL

Teaching and learning will be adapted appropriately to enable pupils learning EAL full access to the wider curriculum by: · Accommodating the language proficiency levels of all pupils learning EAL. · Considering the cognitive potential of EAL learners and planning appropriately challenging tasks that allow pupils to demonstrate content knowledge. · Setting subject-specific language objectives that will promote language learning progress. · Integrating the teaching of language skills necessary for academic success with content teaching, illustrating to learners how language works in the context of the subject (e.g. the language of enquiry in science). · Employing pedagogical approaches to teaching and learning that promote language development (e.g. using visuals/realia to support spoken explanations, explicit vocabulary teaching, using first languages as a tool for learning, collaborative learning, scaffolding and modelling). EAL learners will be engaged in purposeful, language-rich lessons that reflect their lived experiences and draw on their funds of knowledge, allowing them to acquire the language skills, curriculum knowledge and cultural capital they need to become global citizens of the future.

 

Resources

Children will have access to a variety of resources to aid their learning that include; atlases, maps, photographs (including aerial), compasses, measuring equipment, books and games. Geography resources can be found in the resource cupboard in clearly labelled boxes and are accessible to all staff who are responsible for the safe return and tidy storage of used or borrowed material.

4D Room

Pupils have access to the 4D room, which can be used for developing cross curricular writing whilst also giving an insight to different environments or stages in the past. The website is regularly updated with photographs of learning in the 4D room. It also provides opportunities for parents to take part in workshops and see first hand how the 4D room has enhanced learning by viewing examples of work and talking to the children themselves.

Impact

 

Assessment

Children will be assessed against 3 criteria’s; emerging, meeting or exceeding expectations. Teachers should judge which description best fits the pupil’s performance. It is important in the assessment of Geography that the children are able to communicate geographical information, through maps numerical and quantitative skills.

4

Monitoring

 

  • Book scrutiny to take place every term.
  • Pupil voice to be taken every term.
  • Assessment monitoring sheets to be completed after every term highlighting the children that are in each criteria.
  • Learning walks.
  • Timetabled visits to all year groups.
  • Observations yearly.

 

Co-ordinator Responsibility

The member of staff with responsibility for the co-ordination of geography will augment, advise on and support the development of geography and its provision throughout the school.

 

 

Intent

History and the national curriculum.

 

Aims

 

History is a foundation subject within the National Curriculum. The aims of teaching History at Phoenix Primary School are consistent with our school philosophy and take into account the requirements for the 2014 National Curriculum.

  • To promote positive attitudes and enthusiasm for History
  • To ensure the progressive development of historical concepts, knowledge, skills and attitudes.
  • To introduce pupils to what is involved in understanding and interpreting the past.
  • To develop an understanding of the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day.
  • To know how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world.
  • To develop knowledge and understanding of significant aspects of the history of the wider world.
  • To gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’‛, ‘civilisation’‛, ‘parliament’‛ and ‘peasantry’‛
  • To develop an understanding of historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses.
  • To understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed.
  • To gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales.

 

National Curriculum

 

Key Stage 1 Pupils will be taught about the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time. They will learn where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods. They will be taught a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms. Children will ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events. They will study some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented.

 

Key Stage 2 Pupils will continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study. They will note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms. They will regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance. Children will construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information. They will understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

 

Programmes of Study

 

In Foundation Stage, pupils develop their understanding of the world, people and their communities and technology. This includes investigating history of different communities, their routines and customs and also, looking at the world in relation to ourselves and our place on the globe. These areas can be explored through different themes, which often have links with other subjects.

The school will follow the 2014 National Curriculum Programmes of Study as set out below.

Key Stage 1

 

 

 

 

Key Stage 2

Pupils should be taught:

  • Changes within living memory. Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal aspects of change in national life
  • Events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally
  • The lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods
  • Significant historical events, people and places in their own locality

Pupils should be taught:

  • Changes in Britain from the

Stone Age to the Iron Age

  • The Roman Empire and its

impact on Britain

  • Britain’s settlement by

Anglo-Saxons and Scots

  • The Viking and Anglo-Saxon

struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor

  • A local history study
  • A study of an aspect or

theme in British history that extends pupils’‛ chronological knowledge beyond 1066

  • The achievements of the earliest civilizations
  • Ancient Greece – a study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world
  • A non-European society that provides contrasts with British history

 

Implementation

 

Curriculum and school organisation

 

In order to achieve the aims outlined, the teaching of history at Phoenix Primary School organises History into a combination of topics and themes.

History is taught by all class teachers and planning at a year group level ensures that classes within a year group cover the same areas of work.

During these unprecedented times we are unable to invite people with an interest, or expertise, in a particular topic or area of History into school to work with the children due to COVID.

 

Class organisation and teaching style


 

History has many links with other curriculum areas including English, Drama, Geography, Art, R.E., Computing and PSHE, whilst always monitoring the children’s mental health and wellbeing. Also, in delivery of lessons VRFs will be used to check and monitor the children’s emotional intelligence and to ensure they are able to regulate.

 

Approaches to teaching relate to the historical content and the expected outcomes of learning. Whole class teaching might be suitable for acquiring knowledge, while discussion in small groups gives opportunities for investigation work with artefacts. Role-play and simulation activities may help develop understanding and empathy.

 

The requirements of the National Curriculum and the age and ability of the children at Phoenix Primary School influence the resources employed.

  • Artefacts, pictures and photographs, stories, myths and legends, written sources including documents and printed sources, computer-based materials and computer-generated simulation activities.
  • Music
  • Adults talking about the past
  • Buildings and sites, educational visits to museums, the use of fieldwork

 

Health Safety Visits by pupils to the immediate locality, museums and sites of historical interest are an essential part of the History Curriculum. Visits should be well organised and provide a stimulating and valuable experience. The pupils should prepare well for the visit and, on their return, use the experience to good effect in the classroom. The class teacher, or leader, should plan the visit meticulously, with the pupils’ safety and welfare paramount.

Please see the Policy for Educational Visits for more detailed information.

 

 

Resources

 

A variety of history resources are available at Phoenix Primary School. Amongst them are: children’‛s reference books; teacher resource books and packs; photographs; artefacts and newspapers.

 

Most of the resources are kept in the intervention rooms located upstairs and are accessible only to members of staff and student teachers. Children should not remove or replace resources at any time. Resources are shared by all staff, including student teachers and should be returned to their correct place when they are no longer required.

 

The History Co-Ordinator maintains the History resources, and monitors their use. Resources are purchased and replaced by the Co- Ordinator in accordance with the school ordering procedures. The list of resources is examined each year before requisitions are made. All staff may request or suggest resource items they feel would be useful for a History topic.

 

Equal Opportunities

 

All teaching and non-teaching staff should ensure that all pupils, irrespective of gender, ability, ethnicity and social circumstances, have access to, and make the greatest progress possible, in all areas of the Curriculum. History provides opportunities for teaching that reinforces this ideal.

 

Supporting children with SEND

There is an expectation that learning will be adapted for all SEND pupils to enable access to the full curriculum, alongside their peers and to receive ambitious high quality first teaching to acquire the knowledge and cultural capital they will need to succeed in life. This may involve scaffolded modelling and resourcing, and adjusted levels of support to meet individual needs, where appropriate, whilst promoting increased levels of fluency and independence in preparation for their next stage of education, empowering them to achieve their full potential.

See Special Education Needs Policy for more details.

 

Supporting children with EAL

Teaching and learning will be adapted appropriately to enable pupils learning EAL full access to the wider curriculum by: · Accommodating the language proficiency levels of all pupils learning EAL. · Considering the cognitive potential of EAL learners and planning appropriately challenging tasks that allow pupils to demonstrate content knowledge. · Setting subject-specific language objectives that will promote language learning progress. · Integrating the teaching of language skills necessary for academic success with content teaching, illustrating to learners how language works in the context of the subject (e.g. the language of enquiry in science). · Employing pedagogical approaches to teaching and learning that promote language development (e.g. using visuals/realia to support spoken explanations, explicit vocabulary teaching, using first languages as a tool for learning, collaborative learning, scaffolding and modelling). EAL learners will be engaged in purposeful, language-rich lessons that reflect their lived experiences and draw on their funds of knowledge, allowing them to acquire the language skills, curriculum knowledge and cultural capital they need to become global citizens of the future.

 

4D Room

 

Pupils have access to the 4D room, which can be used for developing cross curricular writing whilst also giving an insight to different environments or stages in the past. The website is regularly updated with photographs of learning in the 4D room. It also provides opportunities for parents to take part in workshops and see first hand how the 4D room has enhanced learning by viewing examples of work and talking to the children themselves.

 

Cross Curricular links

 

As well as taking its own part in the school Curriculum, History contributes to the wider aims of Primary Education.

 

English through teaching History

With careful planning, History affords opportunities for children to develop and apply their Literacy skills. Reading and writing skills are essential for undertaking historical enquiry, for collecting information and source material, making notes and following instructions. Children should be able to communicate in ways appropriate for the task and the audience, for example, when interviewing older people about life in the past. Discussion, drama and role play are significant ways in which children can increase their understanding of different historical viewpoints and perspectives. Evaluating historical evidence requires children to articulate their ideas, and to compare and contrast their views with those of other people.

 

Mathematics through teaching History

Children can apply their mathematical skills by analysing data, and studying chronological information. The use of fieldwork data, timelines and charts contributes to the children’s mathematical understanding.

 

Ict through History

The use of ICT can help children’s learning in History by providing a great deal of information. Historical understanding can be enhanced when using CD-Roms to research a significant person, or life, in the past. Pupils can access on-screen timelines to help to develop their chronological awareness. Databases can be used to search for information and identity and explain patterns of change. Children can view countless websites of museums and historical sites around the world.

 

Geography through teaching History

There are close links between the two subjects. An investigation of how an aspect of the local area has changed over a long period, or how the locality was affected by a significant national or local event, will link both History and Geography. As children study British, European and World History they will use and develop their mapping skills and discover the location of places.

 

Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Development through History

History promotes the following:

Spiritual Development

  • Beliefs, religious or otherwise, which inform their perspective on life and their interest in and respect for different people’‛s feelings and values
  • Sense of enjoyment and fascination in learning about themselves, others and the world around them, including the intangible
  • Use of imagination and creativity in their learning
  • Willingness to reflect on their experiences.

Moral Development

  • Understanding of the consequences of their actions and others
  • Interest in investigating, and offering reasoned views about, moral and ethical issues.

Social Development

  • Use of a range of social skills in different contexts, including working and socialising with pupils from different religious, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds
  • interest in, and understanding of, the way communities and societies function at a variety of levels.

Cultural Development

  • Understanding and appreciation of the wide range of cultural influences that have shaped their own heritage
  • Willingness to participate in, and respond to, for example, artistic, musical, sporting, mathematical, technological, scientific and cultural opportunities
  • Interest in exploring, understanding of, and respect for cultural diversity and the extent to which they understand, accept, respect and celebrate diversity, as shown by their attitudes towards different religious, ethnic and socio- economic groups in the local, national and global communities.

 

 

 

Impact

Assessment

 

Children will be assessed against 3 criteria’s; emerging, meeting or exceeding expectations. Teachers should judge which description best fits the pupil’s performance. It is important in the assessment of History that the children can use their knowledge, skills and understanding to describe events and to give explanations why people acted as they did. Pupils should also be able to record their knowledge in a variety of ways, using dates and historical terms.

See policy for Assessment, Recording and Reporting for more information.

 

Monitoring

 

  • Book scrutiny to take place every term.
  • Pupil voice to be taken every term.
  • Assessment monitoring sheets to be completed after every term highlighting the children that are in each criteria.
  • Learning walks.
  • Timetabled visits to all year groups.
  • Observations yearly.
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